Thursday, December 8, 2011

David R. Barnhart: Lutheran leader confronts state's Catholic bishops over gay marriage



David R. Barnhart: Lutheran leader confronts state's Catholic bishops over gay marriage:



To My Brothers -- The Catholic Bishops of Minnesota:

In 1976 I was elected a Lutheran bishop in Minnesota -- one of seven such Lutheran leaders in the state. Over the next years one of the highlights of my time in office was the annual noon-to-noon retreat with our eight Catholic counterparts in the state.

The bond that developed between us was deep and respectful. We shared our differences; we celebrated our likenesses. My friendship with Archbishop John Roach and Bishop Raymond Lucker, in particular, is a blessing I will treasure as long as I live.

May I share a word with all of you who now lead the Roman Catholic community of faith in Minnesota?

First, I would go to the wall to defend your right to work for the adoption of the so-called marriage protection amendment. Having said that, I must tell you that I believe you are making a significant mistake.

Over my 35 years as an active and retired bishop I have come to know hundreds of gay and lesbian persons. I have yet to meet even one who is opposed to the marriage of one man and one woman. After all, they are the daughters and sons of such unions.

What they cannot understand is why church leaders would oppose their fundamental desire and right to be in partnership with someone they love and respect who happens to be of the same gender and sexual orientation. They don't understand why they should not enjoy all the rights and privileges their straight counterparts take for granted.

More than a half century ago Father Francis Gilligan spoke out for equality for African American citizens of Minnesota. Though many argued on the basis of the Bible that these neighbors were inferior to others, Gilligan fought tirelessly for justice for these brothers and sisters.

In our generation homosexual persons are subject to the same discrimination. Their detractors often use the Bible and tradition as weapons of choice.

Is it not time for religious leaders, walking in the footsteps of Father Gilligan, to do the same for another minority, neighbors who are as responsible as our African American sisters and brothers?

I also suggest that you ask yourselves an important question: If the amendment is passed, will it make one particle of difference in our common culture in Minnesota? I don't think so.

Responsible lesbian and gay persons will continue to seek companionship with those they love. This law will only work to drive many of them deeper into closets of anonymity.

Instead, why not welcome them into our communities of faith where they can work side by side with us as equal partners?

Let me put out a challenge to each of you brothers. Invite 15 gay and lesbian persons from your respective areas, one at a time, to spend two hours with you.

Thirty hours are a pittance compared to the time you are investing to promote adoption of the marriage amendment. Use the time, not for confession, but to listen to them describe what it is like to live in our culture in Minnesota.

Hear as they tell you what it means be a child of God and a faithful member of your church, persons who happen to be gay or lesbian through no choice of their own. I can promise you, based on my experience, that your heart will be deeply moved by what you hear.

When you have finished your time with these sisters and brothers in Christ, spend a quiet hour reflecting on a single question: "As I understand the heart of my Savior Jesus, how would he treat these sons and daughters of my church?"

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Herbert W. Chilstrom is former presiding bishop, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.



'via Blog this'

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GJ - I had lunch with Chilstrom (Minnesota Bishop) and some other LCA pastors, at a conference for men in the ministry a certain number of years. He was a pleasant person, face to face, but he was ice cold as a  leader. When his policies caused firings of staff, he managed to be out of town when his co-workers were given security exits - "Don't go back to your office. We will send your personal effects to you. The guard will show you the door."

Chilstrom was definitely an architect of the change from Don't Ask Don't Tell homosexual ordination to Please Ask Please Tell. In the name of UOJ he pronounced everyone except the traditionalists "forgiven, absolved, saved," not that it mattered. Chilstrom taught against the Virgin Birth of Jesus - no one noticed.

When Paul Calvin Kelm ended his Church Growth conference (disguised as evangelism) at Mequon, he had this dramatic statement at the climax of his scripted speech.

"Given what we teach about the Wisconsin Synod, can you think of anyone in the world who would not join if he found out?"

A pause followed.

I said, "Herb Chilstrom?"

The place just rocked with laughter. Even Kelm had to laugh. In fact, the laughter went on so long that he could not say much more, since the laughing kept starting over.

One reader, known only as 29A, wants everyone to remember that the radicals of ELCA were trained in WELS and the LCMS. Their most honored leader, Richard Jungkuntz, was a professor at Northwestern College and a UOJ fanatic.

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Jimmy James has left a new comment on your post "David R. Barnhart: Lutheran leader confronts state...":

This reminded me of an editorial an African-American contributed in yesterday's Detroit Free Press. She was complaining about the "lack of diversity" on today's television. She started in with the way it use to be; The Cosby Show, The George Lopez Show, Family Matters, etc.

I quickly called her Feedback Line and pointed out that today's television has all kinds of diversity! In fact, diversity that other African-American columnists in your paper (i.e. Leonard Pitts) have promoted AND endorsed. They have also compared it with the civil rights movement of Martin Luther King! GAY RIGHTS!

I explained that every cotton pickin' night on the TV, I can find at least a dozen current or previously run television programs that either have a gay plot or feature a gay character(s).

Last week, Tim Allen's new TV show had a plot about a new lesbian couple that moved into their neighborhood. I changed the channel and found an old episode of "That 70's Show" featuring the same used plot! Only this time, it was two gay men who moved into the neighborhood! (And the two actors who were playing the gay men were two of the three "Brady Bunch" brothers!)

Every time I look around, it's in my face....
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