Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Peter Moeller, PhD - On The Faith of Jesus: Against the Faithless Lutherans


Pastor Jackson,  I cannot begin to tell you how thankful I am to get your newest book.  Read it in but two sessions!  This is very well done and (sadly) timely.  I wish people saw the terrible logical pitfalls of teaching the UOJ, the outcomes (church growth, etc).  yet we always seem to shoot ourselves in the foot. 

Wish I had your gift with words in putting this together.  Jane and I think of you often and wish we could meet again.  I was greatly touched by the dedication to Pastor Harley.  His wife passed away only a couple of years ago so that chapter in my book is closed.  Yet he was such a great theologian - and even better a great teacher.  

I wish  you and your church the very best in Christ.

Peter Moeller, PhD

Coffee - Better and Cheaper at Home

The congregation in Sturgis had an idea about the coffee left in the urn. "You could warm it up to drink during the week,"

Instead of taking up that frugal suggestion, I made my own coffee. Reheated, percolated coffee left in an aluminum urn was not my culinary fantasy.

At Melo-Cream I was always happy to go down to the coffee barrel where the Yuban coffee was kept. My father mixed Maxwell House and Yuban, used a drip coffee maker, and insisted on keeping coffee no longer than 15 minutes.

The favor of coffee is mostly in the aroma, so drinking it fresh is the key to enjoying it. Here are some key steps in making delicious coffee.

Pure Water
The water has to have its off-flavors filtered out. We use a tap filter for that. Otherwise, the coffee competes with the flora and fauna of the lake water we get on tap. I would get spring water and use that ($1 gallon) if I had to.


Fresh
The freshness of the coffee grounds will make an enormous difference. I stopped grinding it each time because the early morning or late night sounds were like gravel being ground up, and the results were uncertain. I put in too much in one batch or two and had truly awful coffee, too weak or too strong.

But we keep the coffee sealed up tightly in sealed containers, one from Gevalia, which we no longer buy. They used to offer wonderful coffee storage devices, and we still have one for the favorite variety of the day. We got a free one each time we tried Gevalia, every six months, so we did, and kept the jar. Alas we only have one jar left.

Now the free offers are for one measuring spoon, so I have two spoons I keep, and I keep track of the amounts used for a good pot of coffee.

Let us pause and consider cost. A large Starbucks cup of coffee is $2 plain. Their fancy concoctions are $4 and up, $24 a gallon, if you take 6 x the 20 ounce cup! Starbucks' plain coffee is one step above restaurant coffee, two steps above church coffee.

High quality coffee is $2 per 10-cup pot at home. The cost is even lower with premium grocery store coffee. Gevalia is found at Walmart and is fairly good. Some other brands can be found there too, and many favored ones as well.

K-cups are more costly per pound but convenient with a large group of people wanting fresh coffee - or hot cocoa - at various times. I was converted Keurig in Seattle, of all places, but the numbers are not favorable for beginning the day with a pot of fresh coffee.

I like Boca Java for several reasons. They have every possible kind and flavor of coffee, and they roast it once the order is in. Therefore, the coffee is quite fresh and the choices nearly reach infinity. They have the best flavored coffees, which are always risky. Most flavored coffees have a bad after-taste and a tendency to be bitter when made. That does not matter when balanced with 50% sweetener and fake cream, as the Starbucks customers know.

The only Boca Java flavors I enjoy are Blueberry and Chocolate Hazelnut. Nevertheless, the other attempts at flavoring are pretty good. I can make perfect cinnamon coffee by shaking some cinnamon on the coffee grounds before making the pot. Others do the same thing. It reminds me of apple sauce with cinnamon at the store. I remembered my mother doing that on her own, not picking it out at Geifman's store.

Roasts vary the flavor and the caffeine content. The light roasts are higher in caffeine and lighter in flavor. Dark, French, and Expresso roasts are not my cup of tea.



The Machine
Our previous drip-maker was a Mr. Coffee that emptied into a thermo-carafe. That wore out after six years. Their latest model  was panned in the Net so I looked around and settled on a Black and Decker thermo-carafe.

This maker is easy to fill and works very well. My only problem is the clock blinking 12:00 all day long, but I ignore that.

Coffee Varieties
The most expensive is Jamaica Blue Mountain, half the crop used for coffee liquor, a terrible waste. Boca Java must have made tons for Father's Day, because they sold it cheap afterwards. Otherwise, it is something like $50 a pound.  JBM is mellow but has a good flavor at the same time. If I had a choice between JBM and Kona, I would take Kona.

Kona is from Hawaii and combines a great flavor with smoothness. Often a coffee will get a bit much after a few cups, but Kona is so smooth that overdosing is likely. Fortunately, the high cost of $40 a pound will prevent that problem. I bought some on sale at Boca Java - and wow.

We favor light and medium roast coffee. Some come from on location, like Costa Rican and Kona, and JBM.

Another benefit of regular Boca Java ordering is their free sample. One two-ounce packet is offered free each time, so we have tried Banana Foster (a slight chocolate flavor with bananas), Maple Bacon (noping that one), and types with coconut in the background. Since coconut is so easy to obtain now, an artificial coconut flavor in coffee is not choice. Now I am more likely to pick various roasts, but they snagged me with Chocolate Hazelnut.



Amendments
I used to make my own whipped cream to add to coffee, a slippery slope. Sometimes the old cup would be found in the basement, with howls of outrage coming from Little Ichabod, Mrs. Ichabod, or both.

The coffee aisle at Walmart is heavenly, because the coffee aromas are mixed with the artificial cream fragrance. Bending down into a case of half-pound coffees in bags, I thought about the old coffee barrel at Melo-Cream.

However, I would never put those artificial powders and cremes in my coffee. Whipped cream is off the menu for obvious reasons. I could easily finish a bowl off, but that is not wise.

The only amendment approved by the Melo-Cream Little Chef is Cream of Coconut, which is found in the mixed drink aisle of stores. How do I know, with my aversion to drinking alcohol? One customer came looking for it at the Neighborhood Market and the assistant manager directed us to the cubby hole for beer and liquor. On display was Cream of Coconut, used  for pina coladas. The concoction, made of coconut juice, coconut oil, and sugar, is perfect on desserts (like pineapple) and also good for taking the bitterness from a cup of coffee made a little too strong. The bottle is not expensive, a few dollars, and lasts a long time without refrigeration.

Combat typos - start the day with coffee.




Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Bivens Plagiarizes Zarling, 13 Years Later, Same Quotation and Citation.
But Both Are Lying About the Chief Article, the Master and Prince.




Stand in Awe of Justification
The Diamond Among the Jewels of Divine Revelation
M. Zarling 

[Presented to The Minnesota District Pastoral Conference April 12-13, 1983 at Martin Luther Ev. Lutheran Church St. Louis, MO]


The doctrine of justification is the shining jewel of our faith. Indeed, this teaching of Scripture is the heart and core of Christianity. Luther, as is well known, called justification the articulus stantis et cadentis ecclesiae. Dr. Luther goes on in admiring this jewel by saying:

The article of justification is the master and prince, the lord, the ruler, and the judge over all kinds of doctrines; it preserves and governs all church doctrine and raises up our conscience before God. Without this article the world is utter death and darkness... The doctrine of justification must, as I frequently urge, be diligently learned; for in it all the other articles of our faith are comprehended. And when that is safe, the others are safe too.1 (E. M. Plass, ed, What Luther Says: An Anthology, 3 volumes. (St. Louis: CPH, 1959), 2:703-704.)

The Confessions of our Church echo this regard for the centrality of justification. Each of the symbols of Reformation vintage view justification as "the chief topic of Christian doctrine"2 or words to that effect. Therefore, since we view this doctrine as the central teaching of our church, by which the church stands or falls, it is not without some trepidation that this paper is presented. I certainly must confess, "Who is sufficient for these things?"

Last year, when first approached to take this assignment, I was under the impression that this paper would be a response to the now famous "Kokomo case." (My only criterion for selection was that I happened to vicar in the same conference back in '78-'79, when the situation first developed. Now I know that vicaring for George Boldt is an honor, but I wonder if I should thank him for being assigned a paper purely by association?!) In the intervening year, the Kokomo case has been dealt with by the proper committees of our church. Yet to read the "august" pages of the Christian News one would imagine that the controversy rages on. Such is not the case. I am convinced that our gracious Lord has united the brethren in our Church in a Scriptural understanding of justification. There is no controversy or conflict within the WELS. However, since our position has been raped and plundered by those who put words into our mouths, this paper might prove a beneficial review.

One final word of apology before we start in. The subject matter assigned was "objective - subjective justification." I found the assigned topic rather extensive. Where does one begin? In the course of preparing this essay, brethren asked me to review the Kokomo situation. Others wanted me to cover the Maier case at Ft. Wayne. Others asked for an exegetical presentation of pertinent passages. At the risk of trying to cover everything, yet doing nothing thoroughly, I will attempt to oblige all. I hope to present a brief review of Scripture teaching on justification and also analyze the current difficulties men are having with this central doctrine of the Bible. Let us polish the jewel of justification. We need always to stand in awe of this diamond among all of God's revelation.

I. Listen to Men Describe its Various Facets

Lutherans view justification as the key to understanding God's plan of salvation. To paraphrase a popular ad, we could shout "When you've said justification, you've said it all." The term is a catch-all phrase by which we feel confident that orthodox teaching is preserved. But is it? What have we said? What do we mean? Sometimes the pastor in the pulpit uses a handy theological trade word that only confuses the parishioner in the pew. We need to examine how men try to describe the various facets of this brilliant jewel.

Three phrases are usually applied to the teaching that God has forgiven the sins of all men: "Objective justification", "general justification", or "universal justification." Most of the time these terms are interchangeable. Stoeckhardt3 seems to prefer "general justification," while Pieper4 talks of "objective reconciliation." Only Dr. S. Becker carefully delineates between objective and universal justification.


And Now We Hear the Echo from Bivens, 13 Years Later

The Primary Doctrine in Its Primary Setting: Objective Justification and Lutheran Worship [Prepared for the WELS National Conference on Worship, Music and the Arts Carthage College, Kenosha, Wisconsin, July, 1996.

“The article of justification is the master and prince, the lord, the ruler, and the judge over all kinds of doctrines; it preserves and governs all church doctrine and raises up our consciences before God. Without this article the world is utter darkness and death.” (What Luther Says, Vol. 2. p 703.) Luther’s appraisal of the doctrine of justification is also ours. We hold it to be the primary doctrine of Scripture, that is, the central and most important teaching revealed by God for us sinners.2 

The truth of justification, above all others, distinguishes Christianity from all other religions. If this teaching were obscured or lost, attempts to show significant differences between the Christian religion and others would ultimately prove to be futile. Also, as revealed and emphasized in the Bible, all other doctrines either prepare for or flow from this chief article of faith. Without this truth, all others would mean little. This doctrine is the source or basis of the benefits and blessings which mankind receives from God. 

What precisely is this “master and prince, lord, ruler and judge” over other doctrines? Justification is a declaratory act of God, in which he pronounces sinners righteous. As revealed in the Bible, this declaration of God is made totally by grace and on account of Jesus Christ and his substitutionary life and death on behalf of mankind. To phrase it somewhat differently, God has justified acquitted or declared righteous the whole world of sinners. He has forgiven them. They have been reconciled to God; their status in his eyes has been changed from that of sinner to forgiven sinner for the sake of Jesus Christ. 

But Luther, The Apology of the Augsburg Confession (Melanchthon), and the Formula of Concord Say


***

GJ -  Some are going to say, "Bivens did not plagiarize. He used different wording. It is not the same verbatim - what Zarling wrote and what Bivens wrote. You have violated the Eighth Commandment and Matthew 18 and Volume 17 of the Unwritten Laws of the WELS Sect."

Plagiarists typically follow their source and change a few words here and there. That way the match is not exact, but that is also what gives them away. As several have done or even said in my classes, "Change a few words, and it is not plagiarism."

Note - the Zarling was meticulous in the scholarly citation and Bivens more brief. But it was the same source, same page, same quote. And Bivens also immediately defined the Chief Article as universal absolution, just as Zarling did. Like Zarling, anyone who teaches other than justification without faith is a destroyer of Christianity, plus all the other denunciations called down by Luther. Brilliant - except for one thing - Zarling and Bivens are the object of Luther's wrath.


The Chief Article is not the Halle Dogma loved by Rambach, Stephan, and Webber, but justification by faith - as stated twice in the Book of Concord, and constantly taught in those confessions.

Let us dare not chuckle that these two intellectual giants of WELS failed to consult the Book of Concord. Would they discuss Vatican decrees from My Golden Book on the Church of Rome? I think so.

But - since I own a faded and well used copy of What Luther Says, 3 vols., I looked up their joint quotation. Look at what I found. The LCMS publication does not mention justification by faith for pages, but constantly lists this or that Luther quotation as Objective Justification - Oh! Oh! Oh!  - or Subjective Justification.That is a cute way to adjudicate the issue before it is presented.

Teachers - in contrast to synodical puppets like Zarling and Bivens - present the Scriptures and Confessions without making the recent Pietists the ultimate authority on God's Word and the Confessions. Zarling and Bivens are like Marxists who treat every issue as the battle of the proletariat against the oppression of the capitalists, whether Goldilocks or Luther or Shakespeare. OJists only find OJ and their SJ is not even justification by faith, but faith in their absurd dogma of universal absolution and salvation without faith.

As readers know, I copied this from Dr. Robert Preus,
Justification and Rome.

James 3 My brethren, be not many masters, knowing that we shall receive the greater condemnation.

Zarling and Bivens are conscientious, careful, and deliberate liars. Which is worse - they know the truth and deny it? Or- they are so poorly trained themselves that they have no idea what is taught in the Scriptures, Luther, and the Book of Concord?

WELS is betting the farm on this absurdity.
If JP Meyer is wrong, then so is CFW Walther
and his syphilitic bishop!



The Left-wing of Lutherdom (ELCA) Is in Perfect Alignment with WELS, Missouri, the Little Sect on the Prairie, and the CLC (sic)

So much Schwan guilt, so much Schwan money,
so many shiny buildings at Bethany College in Mankato,
the Little Schoolhouse on the Prairie.

When I look at posts being read at the moment, in the stats file, I often update them after copying the HTML into a new post.

I also challenge supposedly conservative Lutheran pastors on Facebook, who post their sanctimonious comments about how evil that other church body (ELCA) is. I ask them why they work with ELCA - if it is so evil - and they have 100,000 excuses and denials.

Nothing is clearer than Mark and Avoid Jeske's joint ELCA-WELS-LCMS ministry conferences, funded by various evildoers with loot to spend - Seibert Foundation, Thrivent, Schwan, etc.

Anoint yourself with the Holy Spirit and give yourself a call in WELS.
Here is the Odd Couple of WELS with their baby.


Modified Limited Shunning in WELS and LCMS
One would expect by the haughty tones of WELS and Missouri that they would shun, avoid, and never appear in the same place as ELCA.

But Jeske is just the latest in a long line of ELCA enablers. Mischke was doing the same thing in WELS, as Synod President, and that was several bosses ago. Gurgle did more of the same, and Mark Schroeder accelerated the trend with his blanket endorsement of the Jeske Crime Family, whether they were drinking to excess - a virtue in WELS - or abusing women.

But, as I wrote before, play one chord on a non-WELS pipe organ and an email arrives from the Synod President. Why not a personal visit? After all, Mark Schroeder traveled to Appleton to rescue Jeske disciples Glende and Ski from the consequences of their words and deeds.

And when Glende and Ski sued a staffmember's husband in court, where was the righteous wrath of the Coven of Presidents?

Shunning is more flexible than Silly Putty in Missouri and WELS.


From 2011 - WELS Church Growth Hero Cho -
A New First Name and a Criminal Sentence.
Founder of Possibility Thinking and Church Growth Lost His Own Congregation

Update - Paul Y. Cho changed his name to David - and
got caught  with Number 1 son stealing $12 million from his congregation
.
Schuller lost his precious Crystal Cathedral,
and the Roman Catholics now own it.
I shook hands with Paul Y. Cho, after hearing him give an opening prayer at the Billy Graham Center at Wheaton College.
Hey, I was not buying his Dreck by the case and selling it to ministers,
unlike one WELS pastor.
I was an LCA pastor at the time, invited to speak at Wheaton College.


"'But Honey, I've got all these five million dollars inside of me. They're growing now! Oh, inside me it's growing.' Suddenly those five million dollars had turned into a small pebble on my palm."
Paul Yonggi Cho, with a foreword by Dr. Robert Schuller, The Fourth Dimension, 2 vols., South Plainfield, NJ: Bridge Publishing, 1979, I, p. 27.

Napoleon Hill occult practitioner Robert Schuller
is being channeled by Mark Jeske.
Mark and Avoid also loves Napoleon Hill thinking and thinkers - Mary Kay?


"I count it a great honor to write these words as a forword to this exciting book by my brother in Christ, Paul Yonggi Cho. I am personally indebted to him for spiritual strength, and for insights I have received from God through this great Christian pastor. I was ministering to his huge congregation in Seoul, Korea...."
[Dr. Robert Schuller] Paul Yonggi Cho, with a foreword by Dr. Robert Schuller, The Fourth Dimension, 2 vols., South Plainfield, NJ: Bridge Publishing, 1979, I, Hebrews 11:1.

"I believe that the Bible in its original text is the inspired Word of God and is the infallible final authority on faith and methodology." [Note the distinction made by Lindsell in The Battle for the Bible. And although Cho talks in this section about living a moral life, he does not talk about the crucifixion of Christ for the forgiveness of sin.]
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 10. See Battle for the Bible, p.

"In some parts of Asia, people still worship their ancestors. Christianity cannot be accepted by many because it does not teach what the position of one's ancestors are I then shared how the Bible taught us to honor our parents. This did not mean to worship them but to simply hold them in high esteem. God did not want only to honor them while they are still alive, so we could assume that it was not a sin to honor them even after they had passed on to glory. Abraham was still held in high esteem as the father of faith. This gave the spy the ammunition he was looking for. He publicly accused me of being a false teacher and teaching idolatry."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 101. See Christianity Today article

"After praying for him, I taught him the principle of visions and dreams. I said, 'Go back to your bakery, Mr. Ho. Begin to see its success. Start to count the money in the empty cash register and look at all of the people lining up outside to get into your crowded store.' Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 107. "Then I was startled by the very distinct voice of God: 'Son, I am going to heal you, but the healing is going to take ten years.'"
Dr. Paul Yonggi Cho with Harold Hostetler, Successful Home Cell Groups, Plainfield, NJ: Logos International, 1981, p. 11.

"Set Realistic Goals Let us take a pastor who has a congregation of three hundred members. Set a definite goal of one thousand. Place that goal before the Father and begin to dwell on that goal. Become obsessed with the idea of one thousand members. When you preach on Sunday, see one thousand members in front of you. When you have done that, you are ready to start planning."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 111.

"I then said, 'Lord, do you really want me to pray in definite terms?' This time the Lord led me to turn to Hebrews, the eleventh chapter: 'Faith is the substance of things,' clear-cut things, 'hoped for.' I knelt down again and said, 'Father, I'm sorry I made a great mistake, and I misunderstood you. I cancel all my past prayers. I'll start all over again....' I was praising the Lord, and sure enough, when the time came, I had every one of those things. I had exactly all the things I had asked for - a desk made out of Philippine mahogany; a chair made by the Japanese Mitsubishi Company, with rollers on the tips so that I could roll around when I sat on it; and a slightly used bicycle, with gears on the side, from an American missionary's son."
Paul Yonggi Cho, with a foreword by Dr. Robert Schuller, The Fourth Dimension, 2 vols., South Plainfield, NJ: Bridge Publishing, 1979, I, p. 12, 17. Hebrews 11:1.

"Years ago, as I was traveling back from a speaking tour in Europe, the Holy Spirit spoke within my heart, 'Go home and begin a new organization dedicated to the emphasizing of church growth!'"
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 121.

WELS' own Schuller, Mark Jeske,
is seen here misleading the little kiddies at Martin Luther College -
in the name of Evangelism Day.
Then why are WELS  and the college circling the drain,
after decades of Church Growth?

"Years ago, as I was traveling back from a speaking tour in Europe, the Holy Spirit spoke within my heart, 'Go home and begin a new organization dedicated to the emphasizing of church growth!'"
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 121.

"There is no question in my mind about the fresh emphasis the Holy Spirit has brought on the subject of church growth. Church Growth International is not a denomination or a movement limited to one particular type of church. Church Growth International is an organization created to serve the needs of all church leadership throughout the entire world."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 121.

"C.G.I. is meeting with evangelical Christian leaders from all parts of the world."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 124.

"I have received direction from the Holy Spirit concerning the manifestation of the kingdom of God in this earth. The church is to be revived before the second coming of the Lord."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 124.

"Pastor Robert Tilton of north Dallas recently shared with me his story. Pastor Tilton is a member of our C.G.I. television board along with some of the most successful ministers in the United States He is a strong supporter of the C.G.I. ministry."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 128.

"Through much praying, the Holy Spirit spoke to Dr. [Jess] Moody's heart to become familiar with our ministry. Since then, we have become close friends and Dr. Moody is on our C.G.I. advisory board." [First Baptist, Van Nuys, California. Pastor Jess Moody. Featured in Newsweek cover story, December 17, 1990.]
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 129.

"Through much praying, the Holy Spirit spoke to Dr. [Jess] Moody's heart to become familiar with our ministry. Since then, we have become close friends and Dr. Moody is on our C.G.I. advisory board." [First Baptist, Van Nuys, California. Pastor Jess Moody]
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 129.

"Pastor Stanley of the First Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia, came to Korea two years ago with his associate. I did not realize that Dr. Stanley was a noted leader within the Southern Baptist denomination. When he came to Korea, he kept a low profile. He simply said, 'We have come to pray and to learn.'"
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 129.

"In January of the year, I spoke at a Faith Seminar in Winter Haven, Florida. Pastor Quinten Edwards hosted this conference in his beautiful new church which seats over four thousand. Dr. Edwards is also a member of our C.G.I. television board. While at this seminar, the Holy Spirit spoke to me, 'My son, you are to touch every pastor and church leader in this country. Although I give you permission to speak to all Christians, your main task is to share from your heart those things that I have spoken to you with pastors and church leaders.'...Some told me that the anointing of the Holy Spirit was so powerful, they could hardly stay in their seats."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 131.

"Spirit without Word causes fanaticism. Word without Spirit causes 'stagnatism.' A proper balance of both will cause dynamic church growth." [See A. Hoenecke on Spirit and Word]
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 139.

[To bank president]: "'Pick up the phone and call the police. Ask about the name Yonggi Cho, and you'll find he is the pastor of the larrest church in Seoul...He can have all of them transfer their bank account to your bank for the new year. I will do this tremendous favor for you if you do one for me...' 'You write me a $50,000 check,' I told him."
Paul Yonggi Cho, with a foreword by Dr. Robert Schuller, The Fourth Dimension, 2 vols., South Plainfield, NJ: Bridge Publishing, 1979, I, p. 145.

"Years ago I remember praying, 'Lord, I only have 50,000 members. Who will ever listen to me when I speak of church growth?"
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 15.

"When I began my ministry in 1958, I knew nothing about goal setting. So I used all kinds of gimmicks to bring in new members."
Dr. Paul Yonggi Cho with Harold Hostetler, Successful Home Cell Groups, Plainfield, NJ: Logos International, 1981, p. 162.

[When Cho did not get a table, a chair, or a bicycle he had been praying for]: "'Yes,' God said, 'I have given them to you potentially. But you have been asking them of me in such vague terms that I cannot fulfill your request. Don't you know there are a dozen kinds of tables, a dozen kinds of chairs and a dozen kinds of bicycles? Which ones do you want? Be very clear. I have so much trouble with my children, because they keep asking me and asking me and asking me, yet they themselves do not know what kind of thing they want. Make your request very specific, and then I'll answer."
Dr. Paul Yonggi Cho with Harold Hostetler, Successful Home Cell Groups, Plainfield, NJ: Logos International, 1981, p. 163f.

Schuller and Mary Kay are devotees
of the Napoleon Hill occult cult.
Norman Vincent Peale plagiarized it from an occult writer.
Plagiarism is the core of Church Growth copy and paste thinking.

"Today I know that the capacity for God's answer depends on the size of the pipe in which we give Him the opportunity to work. If the size of my pipe is small, the blessings are only going to trickle down; but if through faith I have increased the size of that pipe, the blessings will pour down."
Dr. Paul Yonggi Cho with Harold Hostetler, Successful Home Cell Groups, Plainfield, NJ: Logos International, 1981, p. 165f.

"So I set a very clear goal of 150 members, and I wrote it down on a paper and put it up on my wall...I began to eat with 150. I slept with the number 150 in my dreams. I was living with 150 members in my heart...."
Dr. Paul Yonggi Cho with Harold Hostetler, Successful Home Cell Groups, Plainfield, NJ: Logos International, 1981, p. 166.

"The second of these principles is dreaming. You have to have a goal, yes. But if you don't dream, you will never reach that goal. A dream (or vision) is the basic material the Holy Spirit uses to build anything for you. The Bible says, 'Where there is no vision, the people perish' (Proverbs 29:18). When you don't have a vision, you don't produce anything."
Dr. Paul Yonggi Cho with Harold Hostetler, Successful Home Cell Groups, Plainfield, NJ: Logos International, 1981, p. 168. Proverbs 29:18.

"We can never be any more than we dream of being."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 18.

"The Sunday worship service at Yoido Full Gospel Church will bring you to your knees. Someone has described it as 'A burning bush experience.' When you visit the center of so many miracles at the world-famous Prayer Mountain, you will have time for personal meditation and prayer."
Dr. Paul Yonggi Cho Invites you to the 13th Annual Church Growth International Conference, September 28-October 6, 1992 Yoido Full Gospel Church, Seoul, Korea Dr. Peter Wagner, Fuller Theological Seminary, p. 2.

"All of the books you've read, tapes you've listened to, lectures you've attended, are no substitute for actually experiencing Korea and the CGI conference first-hand!!! (exclamation marks in the original) When you actually see it, you will understand what Dr. Cho has been talking about...and how it really works. You will also discover what many of the churches in Korea and around the world have discovered..that the same methods and principles, when applied, succeed wonderfully in church growth anywhere!"
Dr. Paul Yonggi Cho Invites you to the 13th Annual Church Growth International Conference, September 28-October 6, 1992 Yoido Full Gospel Church, Seoul, Korea Dr. Peter Wagner, Fuller Theological Seminary, p. 2.

"Then I said, 'Close your eyes. Can you see your husband now?' 'Yes, I can see him clearly.' 'Okay. Let's order him how. Until you see your husband clearly in your imagination you can't order, because God will never answer. You must see him clearly before you begin to pray. God never answers vague prayers... They were happily married in that church, and on their marriage day her mother took that paper written with the ten points, and read it publicly before the people, then tore it up."
Paul Yonggi Cho, with a foreword by Dr. Robert Schuller, The Fourth Dimension, 2 vols., South Plainfield, NJ: Bridge Publishing, 1979, I, p. 20f. "

Now the way to deal with a sickness, I learned in medical school, is not just to treat the symptom but to get at the root cause. The sickness is a nongrowing church. The root cause is the leadership's lack of vision for the church by failure to fellowship with the Holy Spirit."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 22.

"Right now I have a vision of 500,000 members in our local church by the year 1984. I wake up with the vision of these people filling my mind and when I go to bed they are just as real as if I were preaching to them today. At our present rate of growth and with our building program underway, I have no doubt that the vision will become reality in the time period which has been allotted."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 23. TE God-willing passage

"If anyone had told me as a child that I would be used by God to build the largest single congregation in history, I would have simply laughed. I was a devoted Buddhist and had no intention of changing."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 24.

"Learning how to coordinate colors and dress conservatively need not be expensive, but it will make a great difference in the way others hear what you have to say."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 25.

"Then the Lord distinctly answered me, 'Yes, that is your idea. My idea is to use the women.'"
Dr. Paul Yonggi Cho with Harold Hostetler, Successful Home Cell Groups, Plainfield, NJ: Logos International, 1981, p. 25.

"They had a clear-cut goal - to have a son...Eventually God gave them a promise, and when they received the assurance, God immediately changed their names: 'You are no more Abram, but Abraham, the father of many nations'...Abraham protested to God, 'Father, people will laugh at us. We don't even have a puppy in our home, and you mean you want us to change our names to 'father of many nation,' and 'princess'? My, all the people in town will call us crazy."
Paul Yonggi Cho, with a foreword by Dr. Robert Schuller, The Fourth Dimension, 2 vols., South Plainfield, NJ: Bridge Publishing, 1979, I, p. 28f.

"Sometimes we pray that God would do something in our church and then we stand back to see what God does. This is a great mistake. If God is going to work in the church, he is going to work through us." [Note that He is not capitalized by Cho.]
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 29.

"Sometimes we pray that God would do something in our church and then we stand back to see what God does. This is a great mistake. If God is going to work in the church, he is going to work through us." [Note that He is not capitalized by Cho.]
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 29.

"An American minister came to my church several years ago to speak. He began by decrying the North Vietnamese and the horrors of the Vietnam War. Although this was a topic of interest to the American Christians, it had little relevance to our Korean members. Few knew that I was adding my sermon to the one that was being preached in English as I interpreted. After the meeting, the visiting preacher was so pleased with the response he received from my members. He never knew that they had not heard his sermon."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 33f.

"Pastor, you can't just release all of these women to lead and not give them any training,' one of the women said to me. 'You have to train them. You have delegated your authority to us. You should delegate your sermons, too. You should not let any of us preach our own sermons.'"
Dr. Paul Yonggi Cho with Harold Hostetler, Successful Home Cell Groups, Plainfield, NJ: Logos International, 1981, p. 34.

"Since the spiritual world hugged the third dimension, incubating on the third dimension, it was by this incubation of the fourth dimension on the third dimension that the earth was recreated."
Paul Yonggi Cho, with a foreword by Dr. Robert Schuller, The Fourth Dimension, 2 vols., South Plainfield, NJ: Bridge Publishing, 1979, I, p. 39.

"A cell group is the basic part of our church. It is not another church program--it is the program of our church."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 42.

"The promise of the Holy Spirit giving the ability to prophesy was not a promise to just men but also to women...I also noticed that women were more loyal and faithful than men in the ministry of Jesus...My advice to you then is, 'Don't be afraid of using women.'"
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 43f.

"We have many different types of cell groups. I have found that there is a basic sociological principle which must be maintained in order for them to be successful. The principle is one of homogeneity."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 44.

"Donald A. McGavran, who has been called the father of the modern church growth movement, states in Understanding Church Growth, 'Men and women do like to become Christians without crossing barriers' (p. 227). This experienced scholar and missionary states many examples of the homogeneous principle working in his research throughout the world."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 46.

"Normally, my ministry on television and radio is geared to reaching the lost with the message of the gospel of Jesus Christ. However, in America, the Holy Spirit showed me that I was to reach the church with the message of church growth."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 59.

"Since I travel a great deal speaking at Church Growth International Conferences, my television ministry naturally developed as a travel program."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 60.

"I believe that as American Christians see what God is doing through the ministry of Church Growth International, they will want to participate financially."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 64.

"So if you don't agree with me on divine healing, don't get offended, love me--you might learn something. I hope you never have to change your mind because you need divine healing."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 86.

"The Book of Acts is not a book of theology, it is a history of the early stages of the church of Jesus Christ. It clearly shows us some principles of revival."
Dr. Paul Y. Cho (with R. Whitney Manzano), More Than Numbers, Waco: Word Books, 1984, p. 94. Acts

***

GJ - I was told to go to Paul Calvin Kelm's evangelism week, when I received the call to Shepherd of Peace in Columbus, Ohio. Floyd Luther Stolzenburg and Roger Zehms, both newly divorced, were also there. They had a Church Growth panel discussion, with David Valleskey speaking, among others. When one of them went into C-gasms about Paul Y. Cho, I challenged them about promoting a known occultic leader kicked out of the Assemblies of God for false doctrine.

Larry Olson, DMin Fuller, wrote later that his buddies smirked at me for that remark. One WELS pastor went to a campus chaplain's meeting where CG materials were passed out and one leader sold Cho books from a case he brought along. Mmm-mmm: that has done wonders for WELS.


---

Mark and Avoid Jeske's appalling work in bringing ELCA, WELS, LCMS, and Napoleon Hill together -

Build a Customer-Centric Church Business To Make More Money.
Even Better - Listen to Pagan Gods Teaching You How To Be Rich!

http://www.christlead.com/speakers.php

From Polluted WELS:

Blogger Der Schwarz Schaf said...
This is nothing less than a complete betrayal of everything that is truly and properly Lutheran. That it is put on by various semi-official entities of the WELS, and features at least 2 District Presidents, shows that it has the blessing of the entire administration. Thus, the rot in the synod goes all the way to the top, even if it didn't start there. This is absolutely disgusting. A petition should be started to condemn this. WELS Pastors - where is your confessional loyalty?!
July 30, 2014 at 5:26 AM
Blogger Gregory Jackson said...
Buchholz signed the secret Internet petition against Mark Jeske, then endorsed Mark Jeske soon after - at the WELS convention. Hysterically funny and so typical of WELS and Buchie. He did the same with Jeff Gunn, who went from leper to lapdog under the watchful gaze of DP Buchholz.

Ann Rhoades

Founding Executive Vice President of People, JetBlue Airways; President, People Ink and Best-selling Author, Built on Values: Creating an Enviable Culture that Outperforms the Competition
Exclusively WSB
Ann Rhoades is a corporate executive with over 25 years’ experience in a variety of service-based industries and is president of People Ink, her consulting company that helps organizations create unique workplace cultures based on values and performance. She held the position of vice president of the People Department for Southwest Airlines and executive vice president of Team Services for Promus Hotel Corporation and most recently, the executive vice president of People for JetBlue Airways where she currently remains as a board member.
Rhoades has a respected reputation in the industry for her creative approach to creating customer-centric cultures. During her tenure with Doubletree Hotels, later Promus Hotel Corporation, she built a service culture focused on delivering outstanding service to guests. During the time Rhoades headed the People Department at Southwest Airlines, she solidified Southwest’s reputation of retaining and hiring the best people in the airline business despite Southwest’s rapid growth during that time.
As one of five founding executives, Rhoades took responsibility for the creation of JetBlue Airways Corporation’s People Team in New York. In her role as head of human resources, Rhoades has been a key member of the executive team, and is extremely successful in her role as internal counsel to executives in every discipline in the organization.
Rhoades is a popular speaker on the subject of customer service and how to build a strong high-performing culture.
Her community involvement includes director on the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center Board, University of New Mexico Alumni Association Board, University of New Mexico Presidential Award Advisory Committee, chairman for Safer New Mexico Now and board member of New Mexico Appleseed. Rhoades has formerly served on the boards of P.F. Chang’s China Bistro, HireVue, Inc., Restoration Hardware, Accion New Mexico, Albuquerque Community Foundation and the University of New Mexico-Robert O Anderson School of Business National Advisory Board.
Rhoades has a Master of Business Administration degree in Management from the University of New Mexico and her book Built on Values was released in January 2011.

Sharon Buck sells Mary Kay Cosmetics and has a prize-winning (for ugly) websty.

See the Mary Kay content here.

Monday, February 8, 2016

The Donkey Poem - Save for Palm Sunday





When forests walked and fishes flew
And figs grew upon thorn,
Some moment when the moon was blood,
Then, surely, I was born.

With monstrous head and sickening bray
And ears like errant wings—
The devil's walking parody
Of all four-footed things:

The battered outlaw of the earth
Of ancient crooked will;
Scourge, beat, deride me—I am dumb—
I keep my secret still.

Fools! For I also had my hour—
One far fierce hour and sweet:
There was a shout around my head
And palms about my feet.

G. K. Chesterton, Notre Dame Visiting Professor
Kelmed from Norman Teigen's blog

Giotto di Bondone, Scenes from the Life of Christ 10.
Entry into Jerusalem, 1304-6,
Cappella Scrovegni, Padova

Follow Up - A Few Notes on Studying Greek

Come back with your shields or on them, soldiers!

One person responded to How To Study Theology with a question about learning Greek.

Here are a few steps to consider:

  1. Avoid classical Greek. The New Testament is Koine. Learn that. It is easier and relevant.
  2. Learn how to read the letters and pronounce the words.
  3. Read the text out loud until that gets easy.
  4. Always read the text out loud first.


Next -
Read John 1:1 in Greek. Translate the words you know. Guess the rest. Then check your KJV. Do not ever write words above the Greek or leave a Bible open. Our lazy brain will go to English first, just as kids will eat candy before meat if left side by side.

Read John 1:2 in Greek. Repeat.

Get used to reading the paragraph out loud. The key is immersion, not words lists, not grammar rules. If we had waited to learn interogatives and subjunctives as babies we would have starved to death.

Management by Sassy

Sassy is signaling me for her morning walk.
I must answer or get into trouble with her.

Everyone loves Sassy, so I decided to describe how she carefully manages our behavior and displays a remarkable amount of intelligence, independence, and humor.

Sometimes we work on threat gestures. I learned early that my intruder pose would get her leaping up and grabbing my hand. Simply by grazing my hand in a fast-moving gesture, she opened up a wound with her teeth. I was dodging without success, and I stopped. The blood stopped soon, and I did not try that again.

Sassy has assumed the role of protecting our yard from a wandering black lab. The neighboring dogs bark at the intruder walking down the grassy alley between our homes. They are large and muscular, but seem helpless. Sassy always asks to go out and take care of the lab. She goes to the fence and does her best German Shepherd attack. She plants her front legs down, barks and snarls furiously, displaying her teeth and moving her head back and forth close to the ground.  The lab takes off and the neighbor dogs bark impotently at him in a me too response.

Sassy even barked the lab out of our neighbor's yard, but the lab got its hind leg stuck up in the wire fence. Black labs matter, so I called Animal Control and got the dog freed in a few minutes. Unharmed and clueless, it came back to the same yard an hour or two later.


We have always worked on the gentle command with Sassy, and she is great responding. When I pretend to form a claw coming down on her flank, she bares her teeth menacingly. But she cannot hold her fierce pose for long, it turns into a grin. She loves the game. She has the fast motions of a Cattle Dog and snaps at my hand with incredible speed - always to lick my hand.

Sacky was our first Cattle Dog. Sacky could kiss my bare feet alternately as I walked, but never while I was looking. I never figured out how she could do that. To illustrate her speed, she simply snapped all houseflies out of the air in Phoenix.



Sassy and I walk twice a day, and she is keen to remind me when the sun is up or going down. I tired of the leash and she was quick to learn commands - wait, leave alone, cross the street, and so forth.
I can wiggle one finger and get her to run full speed at me, both of us grinning. She has to ask permission to cross the street or go meet someone. She has learned not to bark loudly in greeting adults and children. However, one friend loves her happy bark, so she lets loose when she hears, "Where is that happy bark, Sassy?" Left and right, she barks as loudly as she can.

However, Sassy's great response and intuition are tempered by her independent spirit. She loves to walk south down the side streets when we are walking west down Scott Street. Once she asked permission to cross the street and go farther down Scott. When I said yes, she darted left and ran about 20 feet south down the side street. Then she stopped and looked back, grinning. I said, "OK, let's go down that street." She pranced into each yard, catching up on all the signals left by other animals.

When one woman suggested that Sassy leave her front-yard family gathering, with Sassy meeting each child, Sassy responded by going to the woman, laying down her ears and reaching out for a final petting. The woman could not help laughing as everyone enjoyed Sassy trumping her ace. Sassy lays down her ears and reaches out in meek and friendly gesture that no one can miss.

Sassy's goal is to meet each person on our walks. She went up to one man, who said, "Oh, Sassy, you are the dog that loves everyone."

Sassy loves treats: she remembers and counts, always pushing for a greater number at any given time. One treat means two would be better. Two is the norm and three would be nice, as the dessert. The vet suggested breaking treats into small pieces so Sassy could get the count up with fewer calories.

Sassy likes to take one more trip outside once I am settled in bed to sleep. My transition from writing and grading to sleep is quick and easy to make. The bed is the best chair I have used for the painful process of grading 25 essays at a time.

To get Sassy outside before I am nodding off,  I have tried various things, such as snapping my fingers. I even dragged her off  the bed gently - and she crawled back. I used a snack once to get her up and out and another small one to reward her coming inside. After that happened once or twice,  I invited her in. She stopped in the kitchen and glared at me. "Where is treat #2?"

Talking and Singing - The Tell-Tale Tail
Sassy has many ways to talk. She uses her Cattle Dog (kelpie) voice at times. If she yips a little, I ask, "Are you going full kelpie on us?" Then she yips in that high-pitched wild dingo voice of hers, and we laugh.

She is great at singing along, as she did when we sang Happy Birthday to grandson Alex.

The ears, face, and tail are part of her signals. She may make a little whining noise for a moment. We look and ask, "What's wrong?" Her tail rotates slowly. That means she needs a treat or a walk. If I delay or miss the signal, she rotates rapidly and with great force. That can include whipping my arm as I work. Her tails is soft, but the perpetual rotation makes work impossible.

If that fails, she uses her powerful claws to pull me down on the bed for lovey time.

The rotating tail is often paired with her stupid dog look. Sacky pulled that on me too, to show how clueless I was.


How To Study Theology - For Latecomers



Some enter the study of theology later in life, sometimes as laity bewildered by the false doctrine being promoted around them, sometimes as men sensing a calling into pastoral work.

The temptation to regret a late start should be quashed with the facts. Those who go through a system have to grow away from the synod worship imposed on them by years of training. The veterans of a system also have to develop critical thinking skills to replace the rigid conforming imposed by Holy Mother Synod. Few can escape the gravitational pull of both soul-destroying forces.

Roland Bainton trained many generations of church historians;
we were blessed to hear him lecture at Yale.
He also helped me with my dissertation and offered
to xerox some pages of a book for me.


Languages. 
Greek is the most important to learn, and Greek is remarkably easy to learn. I can get kids translating John's Gospel from Greek to English in two weeks. After that, the key is regular practice and use of Greek, so the New Testament is easily read in Greek and not translated at all. As my Latin teacher told us, "Keep at it - and one day your brain will switch on and Latin will be as easy as the newspaper." I kept reading Aquinas in Latin and one day - boom - as easy as skimming the Moline Dispatch. Ditto Greek, Latin, and Hebrew.

Language professors seldom grasp this concept and try to make their language akin to rocket science, so they can occupy the high ground with furtive pathas and iota subscripts.

Hebrew is good to know because the entire Old Testament is different with a knowledge of Hebrew. Someone can be tutored in Hebrew and read Jonah or a little Genesis or Joshua. Psalms are entirely different in Hebrew, which also gives us insight into Arabic. But Hebrew is not going to be used as easily or as often in pastoral work. That is no reason to bypass it altogether. My LCA seminary president discouraged me from taking Hebrew, because "It is not required and will not earn credits." I graduated early anyway and won the uncoveted Hebrew prize for being the only Hebrew student that year.

Language professors awe people by flourishing the rules of grammar in their language, as if humans learn a language by memorizing grammar rules and vocabulary lists. Just the opposite is true. We learn our first language through immersion. Parents say "No, no" and shake their heads. The baby soon learns to say "No, no" and shake his head - and the parents stand back in awe.


Latin is shockingly easy to learn. Roland Bainton taught me the Gospel of John approach. The Fourth Gospel has very simple grammar, short phrases, and repetition of the same word in many passages. Like Greek, learning to read the endings is the key to reading the language. A little tutoring is good for a start and continued reading in Latin (without a pony or a jimmy - nicknames for a Bible as a crutch) will do the job. German, Spanish, and French are similar - easily learned from the Gospel of John. Bainton learned 20 languages this way and had no sympathy for someone who said, "But that is not written in English."

In Latin and Greek, I had Little Ichabod go over the text of John, chapters 1 - 4, carefully. Then we started over, because learning curve had been flattened. After that, he became a rapid reader and ending up translating Latin to English, Greek to English on the fly.

Languages - Conclusion
The best and most worthwhile start is Greek, constantly rewarding and easily repaying time spent getting past the early language study frustrations.

Biblical Theology Is Learned More Than Taught
The more engaged I became in writing about Lutheran theology, the more I realized that most clergy - especially the synod leaders - were simply relying on talking points from seminary, where no one was really challenged to move beyond the trite affirmations the institution's glory.

Example - Mequon would teach against the errors of Calvinism in one class and promote the same errors in the next, with the errors being emphasized as the only way to get things done. In 1987, only one professor was left who was Lutheran in thought and teaching. The rest - like Wayne Mueller - were Pietists with no grasp of Lutheran theology and a decided ignorance of anything outside their enclave on Mt. Zion.

When I was in Cisco training we had to learn the arcane science of sub-net masking, using base two, which few could comprehend when we started. I knew base two from math in Moline, and agreed with the conclusion of two students who said, "Sub-net masking has to be learned. It cannot be taught." The teacher was a burn-out and he could not teach anything, so I began to make my little charts on sub-net masking. When I took the Cisco CCNA test, I scored 8 out of 8 on sub-net masking, which included some devilish examples to break down. However, the test concluded that I really needed some experience before I became an Internet manager, so I donated my books to LI and changed history at a grocery store chain.

How does this apply to theology? someone is asking.
Although it is good to read books and their opinions about Biblical topics, the only way to learn theology is to work through the topics in the Bible itself. Does the Bible really teach the efficacy of the Word, the Word/Spirit combination, the Means of Grace? Each person must teach himself, and that is why so many laity can run rings around lazy pastors stuck in their dog notes from 1884.

The second part of this is to read the non-Lutheran sources and see how Calvinists and Roman Catholics fail to see this and also how they distort concepts with the same name and yet twisted in a new and diabolical way.

Luther said we must know the opposition's dogma better than they do, so much that we could teach it if we had to. Thus we stop their attacks and defeat them with the very weapons they would use against us. Sadly today, that is more true of synodical leaders and professors than other denominations, because the other sects realize Lutherdom is self-defeating with its rainbow coalition of dogmas and fantasies.

Best Lutheran Theology Sets - Two To Own for Mandatory and Continuous Use
This claim is non-negotiable and cannot be swapped for another contingency.

I. Luther's Sermons - Lenker Edition
This is often bought with the Postils, which are also excellent. I will concentrate on the Lenker portion.

Luther did not emphasize evangelism as such, which is a fetish of the Evangelicals and Pentecostals, and by coveting and imitation, the Lutherans today. The Reformer believed and practiced the sermon as the key work of the congregation and the pastor.

We act according to our beliefs, and beliefs are taught. Everyone seems to say Luther was the greatest Biblical scholar and expositor ever, but precious few follow his example of preaching expository sermons from the historic text.

Jesus converted through the external, the spoken Word. He did not break up the crowds into cell groups and give them Reformed tracts to study.

Luther changed the world forever by writing and preaching.

The only way to learn Lutheran theology is to study Luther's sermons, each and every week, and commit passages to memory.

The individual pastor's sermons should be like Luther's almost always verse by verse expositions, delivered without notes - other than the text itself, which should help considerably.

I have taught thousands of working adults to give their oral presentations without notes. Believe me, there is no substitute for 100% eye contact and knowing the content from previous study. Those who free themselves from notes agree. One team of working adults said, "We thought having five resources each was a burden when we started the class. Now we think of five as a beginning. And we do not need notes because we know the subject so much better."

So the use of Lenker, above other sources, should be weekly and continuous until the end of life. There is no better school for Biblical studies, comparative dogmatics, theology, and practical examples.

II. The Book of Concord
Lemme see, which is better - yellowed dog notes from seminary, the collected works of CFW Walther (BA, Leipzig, Pietist Extraordinaire), Paul Tillich, Charlotte Kirschbaum's Church Dogmatics - with notes by Karl Barth,  or -

The Best Writing of Luther, Melanchthon, Chemnitz, and other geniuses of the Reformation?

The Book of Concord is the best one-volume Biblical commentary, the best theology text (apart from Luther), the best comparative dogmatics book, the best sermon starter, the best example for quoting.

The Book of Concord is more of a theology text just as Luther's sermons are Biblical studies, but observe how closely related both are. The Book of Concord organizes the Biblical studies into topics, while Luther preaches theology based on the text for the day.

Warning! Warning! Once the student becomes familiar with Luther's sermons and the Book of Concord, the hollow claims of the "Confessional Lutherans" will become far too evident. Their puffery will sound like the cries of peacocks who struck around with their feathers on display while making the most horrible cries. As Luther wrote, it is as if they have seen their feet of clay and began screaming in protest at their ugliness and fragility.

Father Richard John Neuhaus was a "Confessional Lutheran," just before he became a Roman Catholic priest. So if that is a "Confesional Lutheran," I agree that WELS, Missouri, and the Little Sect of the Prairie are all packed to the gills with them.



The vainglory of the false teachers is so powerful that they cannot abide anyone who knows how ugly are their feet (that is - their doctrinal foundations). They will drive away or peck to death anyone who starts to have a complete and abiding trust in the Word, Luther, and the Confessions. They smugly smile when their deluded disciples praise them and repeat their toxic words verbatim.

Graduation day at ELCA, LCMS, WELS, ELS, CLC (sic)
and the Institute of Lutheran (sic) Theology seminaries.
Almost all of them are UOJ Stormtroopers -
lots of firepower, cannot hit anything.