Saturday, May 11, 2013

Is the Holy Spirit Your Coach?

John Maxwell is far more influential than Luther
in WELS.





Time of Grace · 6,080 like this
6 hours ago · 
  • What does it mean that the Holy Spirit is your Coach?
    • 9 people like this.
    • Anita May Rice he,s my guide,and my life
    • Heather Kjome Buege It encourages me and cheers me on!
    • Connie Nefzger The Holy Spirit gives you power and courage and understanding and guidance. In all you do esoecially in spreading The Gospel.
    • Marilyn West Hayes When I listen to Him, I know when to listen, when to talk, when to pray, and when to walk away. He makes my life so much better, when I heed Him.
    • William Ortis You will have incredible information and wisdom supernaturally brought into your mind. Daydreams will not be mini nightmares. You will wish to do the right things and wonderful things.

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narrow-minded has left a new comment on your post "Is the Holy Spirit Your Coach?":

While I can't judge the hearts of those making the above comments, it certainly sounds as if they could have come from a Joyce Meyer or Beth Moore seminar. It would have been nice to hear one comment stating: "The Holy Spirit shows me the truth of His Word, comforts me with the promises of the Gospel, and maintains my Faith in Christ through Word and Sacrament."

From Wikipedia: Paraclete comes from the Koine Greek word παράκλητος (paráklētos, that can signify "one who consoles or comforts, one who encourages or uplifts; hence refreshes, and/or one who intercedes on our behalf as an advocate in court").[1] The word for "Paraclete" is PASSIVE [emphasis mine] form, and etymologically (originally) signified "called to one's side". The active form of the word, parakletor, is not found in the New Testament but is found in Septuagint in Job 16:2 in the plural, and means "comforters", in the saying of Job regarding the "miserable comforters" who failed to rekindle his spirit in his time of distress.[2]

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Pastor emeritus Nathan Bickel has left a new comment on your post "Is the Holy Spirit Your Coach?":

"narrowminded:"

Excellent comment!

I noticed that not one of these comments mentioned appreciation for the Holy Spirit's conviction of sin in a Christian's life. The Holy Spirit is not called "holy" for nothing.

Nathan M. Bickel
www.thechristianmessage.org
www.moralmatters.org

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GJ - And Pastor Bickel - the conviction of sin begins with not believing on Jesus Christ. I am simply building on what you said, so people do not begin with the wrong image of sin.

Narrow - we can and should judge what people say about their faith. This began with Mark and Avoid Jeske asking


What does it mean that the Holy Spirit is your Coach?

No one said -

This is an absurd question, or

You are confusing John Maxwell with the Holy Spirit, or

What are you capitalizing Coach?


This was set up as a catechism, and it only shows how vague, pan-denominational Christianity is a thin veneer covering the New Age boosterism of Maxwell and other hot air merchants.


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narrow-minded has left a new comment on your post "Is the Holy Spirit Your Coach?":

Thanks for the comments, Pastor Bickel and Pastor Jackson. In light of "Time of (Dis)Grace," I have been thinking about all the AWANA advertising I have seen by Babtist and "community" churches lately. Since I knew nothing about it, I did some research. While it's about what I expected, here it is:

http://awana.org/on/demandware.store/Sites-Awana-Site/default/Default-Start

Just for giggles, I looked to see if any "Lutheran" churches were involved with AWANA.

http://www.stpaulfalls.com/AWANA

http://aboitechurch.org/ministries/children


Please note the second comment on this link:

http://community.babycenter.com/post/a10429895/awana

When finished laughing, I am sad. My former-LCMS circuit was discussing taking a Focus on the Family study and "putting a Lutheran twist on it." Although I left before finding out what they decided, I wondered what was wrong with Christian instruction materials by our Lutheran Fathers.

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GJ -

Fuerbringer thought the best materials on for practical human relationship problems came from the house-postils (sermons) of Luther.


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