The Glory Has Departed


Norma Boeckler, Artist-in-Residence

The Lutheran Library Publishing Ministry

Bethany Lutheran Worship on
Ustream - Sunday, 10 AM Central.


Advent Services - 7 PM Central Time in December.

Saved worship files and Greek lessons are at the live worship link.

email: greg.jackson.edlp@gmail.com,
which works as gregjacksonedlp@gmail.com too.

Luther's Sermons, Lenker Series
Book of Concord Selections
Martin Chemnitz Press Books

Norma A. Boeckler Author's Page

Pastor Gregory L. Jackson's Author's Page

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

I Almost Raked the Leaves Yesterday

"You throw leaves away?"

We are enjoying warm weather and sun rather than the dreadful winter predicted. The lawn is greening up for spring, but the leaves are finally gone from the trees.

Our helper came over for a last effort with the leaves. He mowed the front lawns, mulching the leaves with the grass, which is much neater than trying to rake them. In the back we are keeping them whole and raking them over the gardens near the house and in the back section.

I like the way leaves naturally fall into the mulch and stick there. They will be easily absorbed by soil creatures in the spring. We use excess leaves around the front evergreen bushes, to suppress weeds and feed the soil under those bushes. The evergreens provide good cover for insects and birds, and they are much better than lining up roses against the house.

I have two areas for raking leaves in the front. The crepe myrtle bush has a tepee of leaves at its base, but I will expand the leaf mulch with the ample supply on the driveway. The maple tree will be encircled by roses, so I am adding leaves to the perimeter, to help the soil  and the digging in spring.

In the backyard we want leaves in the compost, over the mulched garden areas, or on the future butterfly-hummingbird area. The beneficial insects book has inspired me to get a wide variety of bee and butterfly plants growing where parasitoid wasps will prosper and do their work.



Leaves are scorned by many organic gardeners for being mostly carbon and low on nitrogen. But what did we learn about carbon, class? Bueller? Bueller? Anyone? Anyone?

Fungi are the heroes of decomposition in the soil, because they feed nutrition and water to the plant roots, in exchange for - carbon from the plants. Fungi need carbon to grow, so autumn leaves are ideal for the health of the soil and the growth of all plants. The soil creatures will sort out what they need, even while we rest in bed, pull up the covers, and roll over for a few more winks.


While you were sleeping I posted another
contribution to Creation Gardening.