The Glory Has Departed


Norma Boeckler, Artist-in-Residence

The Lutheran Library Publishing Ministry

Bethany Lutheran Worship on
Ustream - Sunday, 10 AM Central.


Thanksgiving Eve - 7 PM Central Time.

Saved worship files and Greek lessons are at the live worship link.

email: greg.jackson.edlp@gmail.com,
which works as gregjacksonedlp@gmail.com too.

Luther's Sermons, Lenker Series
Book of Concord Selections
Martin Chemnitz Press Books

Norma A. Boeckler Author's Page

Pastor Gregory L. Jackson's Author's Page

Friday, April 10, 2015

Sub-Net Masking the Water System - Hosery

The Jackson Aerial Aqueduct is not as splendid as this Roman one,
but I can water the entire back yard with soaker hose by turning on one faucet.
Maynard G. Krebs would be so proud, and the birds love me.


We pay tribute to Ancient Rome when we talk about plumbing and plumbers. The name comes from the Latin word for lead, which was used for lining pipes, and the Romans knew about the dangers, even then.

I pay tribute to Cisco, for teaching me sub-net masking in their CCNA course in network engineering. I passed, barely. One network engineer called his work "plumbing with electrons." Reversing that, I sub-net mask with water.

There is one faucet in the front yard, one in the backyard. How can I water everything and still have a hose for the personal touch, such as splashing roses? I was splashing roses this morning and filling various lids at the Jackson Bird Spa.

Most people use a divider on the faucet, to get two different streams of water, each with a shut-off valve. Necessary, but not sufficient, as Notre Dame taught me to say. I add another doubler to one and get three different streams, two for soaker hoses, one for the non-leaking personal hose.

Grackles love water, even more than most birds,
and they destroy insect pests.

Water the Seedlings, Splash the Roses
One reader asked about the new plants. My first mistake in gardening, years ago, was neglecting the seedlings. We are fortunate that we have abundant fresh water to get seeds established.

Earlier we had rain and more rain, so the mulch held the rain and protected the seeds from the early cold. I could probably rely on mulch moisture now, but the beans and carrots are just starting, so I water extra.

My above ground cisterns for rain water are two giant Rubbermaid barrels. The lids are birdbaths, very popular ones at that, because they are so shallow.

The more I appreciate a plant or need a good start (roses, new transplants) the more I hand-water with rain or stored water. I used up almost all the rainwater, which has dissolved nitrogen compounds in it.
Second best is stored water with the chlorine evaporated out.

New roses are not only watered at the base, but also splashed on the canes. In fact, I give roses a shower all the time, no matter how mature they are. The canes respond at once. They seem far more reliant on water on their stems than other plants.

Roses need mulch, watering, and pruning. Neglect any one of the three basic needs and the roses will disappoint. Pruning is nothing more than removing dead wood, crossed canes, and beautiful flowers. The more the flowers are removed, the more the bush produces. I would like an annuity like that.

Tropicana can last two weeks in a vase.