The Glory Has Departed


Norma Boeckler, Artist in Residence

Bethany Lutheran Worship on
Ustream


NT Greek Lessons - Thursdays, 7 PM.

Saved worship files and Greek lessons are at the live worship link.

email: greg.jackson.edlp@gmail.com,
which works as gregjacksonedlp@gmail.com too.

Luther's Sermons, Lenker Series
Book of Concord Selections
Bente's Historical Introductions,
and Martin Chemnitz Press Books

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Major Thunderstorm Rolls Through.
Is That a Weed?


Yesterday was one of threatening rain, which often means no rain. But the air cooled and overnight the storm let loose. The almost empty rain  barrels filled and overflowed.

The rain continues to fall so hard that Sassy looked outside and decided against a stroll in the backyard, where she often defends her territory against neighboring dogs - by barking at them. Sometimes the warnings are so urgent inside she must run outside and give them a piece of her mind.



Weed Abatement
Our helper came over to work on weed abatement, the term used by cities for cutting weeds. Last year the issue was crab grass, which we smothered with newspapers and mulch. Now we have grassy weeds pushing through the mulch.

The new rose garden along the fence was fostering some new weeds, so that was attacked. I hastened to point out the bee balm.

A young bee balm plant could easily be another weed. Pigweed starts out rather benign and looks rather majestic when blooming. Ragweed sprouts with big ugly leaves and just gets worse. No wonder it is called ragweed.

I pulled a bee balm leaf off folded it over and showed him - fragrant. "This is a mint that does not invade like other mints. Bees, beneficial insects, and hummingbirds love it."

The great thing about bee balm - for the wild garden - is being able to transplant clumps of it. This is the first year for young plants, so they are just getting started. Once the hummingbirds know a food source, they come back and look for it.