The Glory Has Departed


Norma Boeckler, Artist-in-Residence

The Lutheran Library Publishing Ministry

Bethany Lutheran Worship on
Ustream - Sunday, 10 AM Central.


Advent Services - 7 PM Central Time in December.

Saved worship files and Greek lessons are at the live worship link.

email: greg.jackson.edlp@gmail.com,
which works as gregjacksonedlp@gmail.com too.

Luther's Sermons, Lenker Series
Book of Concord Selections
Martin Chemnitz Press Books

Norma A. Boeckler Author's Page

Pastor Gregory L. Jackson's Author's Page

Friday, January 15, 2016

Grey Slipper Thrown Away - More Rotten Wood Found


The Michigander suggested we thrown away things not used since we moved to Springdale. We are turning the garage into the Great Room - at last. The grey slipper finally had to go. I have been waiting for its mate to show up for three years. Every so often, on a cold day, slippers are great. "Why buy another pair?" I reasoned. The grey slipper moved from the garage to one room, then the next, then back to the garage. With reluctance and the deliberate speed of an Anglican bishop, I finally threw it away.

Sassy wants her walk soon after 7 am each day. We have a great time, meet various friends, and explore the area. Wind storms knock dead wood off trees and I bring it home, trying to look casual as I carry it home.

No one has stopped me, but they should. I am taking home toad abodes. They are irregular lumps of wood already in the initial stage of rotting. When wood touches soil, fungi begin to break the structures down and channel the nutrition to plant roots. Rotting wood also attracts the soil creatures of decay, like slugs and earthworms, and toads enjoy the meals coming to them. Besides, toads enjoy warm, moist places and shade from the drying sun, the very places sought by various pests.

"Hello darkness my old friend,
I'm come to rest in you again
Because the sunlight is a-burning
Leaving me with coolness yearning...
WHAT ARE THOSE EYES? TOAD!"

Toad Abodes:
All amphibians require water to survive. Besides building a pond in your backyard, you can provide moisture by having shady areas where dew collects, moist patches of soil and/or rotting vegetation. Let the edges of your garden grow wild with cover giving amphibians places to hide from the hot sun. One man built a Toad Abode, with a piece of wood. When placed in a cool part of the garden, toads sat under the two inch opening enjoying bugs attracted to the dark.

Rocky retreats for toads can be made by placing stones to form a rocky burrow about 10 centimeters high with a sandy floor where toads can dig. Use small sections of brick drain pipe covered with rock or pieces of concrete blocks broken to allow access to the toad chamber. Plant ferns to shade the area or, if it is too dry, a garden sprinkler can be used to increase moisture levels.