The Glory Has Departed


Norma Boeckler, Artist-in-Residence

The Lutheran Library Publishing Ministry

Bethany Lutheran Worship on
Ustream - Sunday, 10 AM Central.


Advent Services - 7 PM Central Time in December.

Saved worship files and Greek lessons are at the live worship link.

email: greg.jackson.edlp@gmail.com,
which works as gregjacksonedlp@gmail.com too.

Luther's Sermons, Lenker Series
Book of Concord Selections
Martin Chemnitz Press Books

Norma A. Boeckler Author's Page

Pastor Gregory L. Jackson's Author's Page

Sunday, March 20, 2016

Procession of Bulbs in Spring


Hardy or Fall Bulbs

They like to freeze over the winter, so they are like the Michiganders who brag about six months of winter so they can ski longer.

Bulb flowers are fun to watch flower in early spring and into the summer. Some are not true bulbs, but let's avoid that distinction for now. We call those plants that store a lot of energy or even the flower to be in the soil - bulbs.

Daffodils are trusty, reliable, colorful, and distasteful to critters (who love crocus and other edibles, including tulips.) They come up first, although I might have planted some earlier ones like snowdrops, snowflakes, and crocus for the squirrels to eat or dig up and rebury, giving the gardener a bad reputation for gardening under the influence. Not guilty!

Daffodils multiply too, another good quality.



Grape hyacinths are little flowers that multiply. A previous renter planted them, and they keep coming up, even though I have ignored them. Given their attractive and colorful little flowers, which Mrs. Ichabod noticed, I will plant quite a few this fall.



Real hyacinths are fragrant and expensive. They bloom well the first year, then fade back. I look at my neighbor's and admire them. If I planted them I would plant quite a few for the color and the display. Many plant a few because of the cost, which makes little sense to me.



Tulips bloom at various times, from the very early to much later. Colors and styles vary enormously. They are edible and fade over time, but I have not had a critter problem with them. Buy the best and really enjoy one color or contrasting colors. Mixed bulbs from bargain counters are not going to be as pleasing, but they are better than nothing at all.

Giant alliums can inspire fear. I had one girl pose with them years ago -
she was intimidated by a flower as large as she was.
Giant allium seem to bloom only in my yard. They are expensive per bulb, but they are garlic (trouble free) and create quite a spectacle in later spring. Smaller versions, purple or white, can be planted too. Every member of the family has a similar flower, but the larger, showier ones make people ask, "What are they?"

Tender Bulbs, Also Called Spring Bulbs
Tender bulbs do not like to freeze, so they are planted in the spring rather than the fall.

Calladiums are a perfect shade plant.
Ever have a package arrive in the mail, full of plants or seeds, and you wonder, "Did I order these? What are they?" Well, you are a gardener. I ordered calladiums from one place and forgot the name of the supplier until this big package came.

Calladiums - hard to remember the name, easy to love as a plant. They are tender and need to be dug up in the fall or heavily protected in the winter. I chose the second and we had a warm winter. I am not likely to dig up bulbs and have no good place to store them (frozen garage?), so they have to cope in the soil with a maple leaf blanket over them.

Great qualities. They are colorful and love to show off in the shade. In fact, they do not like being sun-drenched. I chose them for under the crepe myrtle bush and around the maple tree rose garden. Their low level leaves should keep them from competing with the roses.


Giant mega-elephant ears. I saw two bulbs on sale. They are ridiculous but fun. I will have to post them on each side of the maple tree rose garden.