The Glory Has Departed


Norma Boeckler, Artist in Residence

Bethany Lutheran Worship on
Ustream

NT Greek Lessons - Thursdays, 7 PM.

Saved worship files and Greek lessons are at the live worship link.

email: greg.jackson.edlp@gmail.com,
which works as gregjacksonedlp@gmail.com too.

Luther's Sermons, Lenker Series
Book of Concord Selections
Bente's Historical Introductions,
and Martin Chemnitz Press Books

Sunday, May 8, 2016

Everyone on Our Street Gets a Rose Bouquet on Mother's Day


I watered the Jackson Rose Farm last week so most roses would be peaking on Mother's Day. I got up extra early today, took Sassy for her walk, and got out my equipment:

  1. Nine vases and cups.
  2. Rose shears.
  3. A gallon of water.


I refreshed the altar flowers left from Ascension Day on Thursday, then began harvesting roses for the nine vases. We have nine homes on this cul-de-sac, besides ours, and each one has a mother or someone with a mother, so each one got a bouquet.

Several got premium bouquets -

  • Mrs. Gardener next door adores roses but her husband does not have a knack to grow them.
  • Our friend with daughters galore - the four S sisters - got a special bunch. Each daughter's name begins with S, so we just call them the four S's.
  • Our landscaper Army Ranger vet lost his mother not long ago, so he and his brother living there and their step-father all mourn her.
One neighbor, who loves our roses and other flowers, caught me in the act. She and her daughter followed me back to the yard and thanked me over and over for the roses. She had a packed vase of pink KnockOuts with some other roses for contrast.

The Army Ranger's brother came during church to return their vase and thank my wife. She said, "He would come out but he is broadcasting a worship service right now." They were very happy to have roses to take to their mother's grave today.

Our Laotian neighbor across the street came over with a bag of cooked rice, to talk to Chris and get a tour of the rose garden. They talked about Janice, who used to sit on the patio to enjoy the roses. Our Laotian neighbor wants to do the same.

Later, our helper came by to help plant Elephant Ears, some mountain mint, and spirea. We finally have the putative tomato (sunny) garden covered with cardboard and some of the mulch. He took home a giant Pope John Paul II and a big red KnockOut for his wife.

One KnockOut Bush provided most of the red flowers, but a few lucky people got the fragrant Mr. Lincoln rose.


Most  of the White Roses Under Attack by Aphids
Our helper asked about Sevin (a pesticide) and tomatoes. I got a chance to describe what I do with aphids. My speech follows.

"Aphids are attacking the white Pope John Paul II roses. Look at how rotten they are. I do not consider aphids bad, because they are food for pest eaters. I am leaving the aphids alone so the beneficial bugs have food and settle in here. Then they will wipe out the second aphid invasion by eating them or letting their children eat them."

He said, "So using Sevin just keeps a cycle going?"

I said, "Yes. You kill the aphids or tomato worms or another pest. All the pest-eaters are without food and you kill the vast majority of beneficial bugs and spiders. I let God's creatures eat them for nothing instead of buying pesticide. Call me cheap, but it works."


I Always Wanted To Have Elephant Ears
Elephant Ears are a tropical bulb, and we still had one great place for them in the front yard, plenty of sun and run off from water. Precious little water runs down toward the sidewalk without being used by an ornamental plant.

I am looking forward to posing our grandson under or behind one of these leaves. I can tell if children will like a plant or flower. If I love it, so will they.

Grandson Alex pruned my roses the first year we had them. I taught him to flick the flower with his fingers to see if the petals were loose. Those were spent flowers to cut. In fact, any flower or bud cut will direct more energy to production in the plant. Exhibitioners will prune good buds and flowers to make the others even better. So he learned - prunes are good for bushes too.

Fever Few is tested as good for migraines,but also a great host for beneficial bugs.


Beneficial Bug Plants
I planted all our mountain mint plants, which are good for beneficial buds. One is in the front yard. Two are in the back yard.

The spirea bushes in the front and back yards will attract butterflies and pollinators. 

When the promised rain comes, I will sow Fever Few and Comfrey in the Wild garden

Comfrey is a bigger, uglier version of Borage.
Everything mentioned here today is an herb, including roses.