The Glory Has Departed


Norma Boeckler, Artist-in-Residence

Bethany Lutheran Worship on
Ustream


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Saved worship files and Greek lessons are at the live worship link.

email: greg.jackson.edlp@gmail.com,
which works as gregjacksonedlp@gmail.com too.

Luther's Sermons, Lenker Series
Book of Concord Selections
Bente's Historical Introductions,
and Martin Chemnitz Press Books

Thursday, September 1, 2016

The Subject Was Roses.
One Vase Generates Four Conversations

Falling in Love


Mrs. Ichabod had a follow-up visit to the physician's assistant, so we took along a vase of roses for the reception staff. These roses were exceptional, because the recent rain and the cooler weather favored blooms from all our favorites. And that was after a splendid group last Sunday.

First Stoppage - Mrs. Ichabod held the vase in her hand as she walked into the physician's office area, which was fronted by an information desk. Two men stopped her and began asking about the roses. Soon they were talking about Germany and everything else. I gave up and went on to the check-in desk. I advised the cardio desk to avoid saying, "This is where you check out."

Second Stoppage - The roses arrived as I was dealing with the co-pay. Quite a few ladies work in the area between the waiting room and the exam rooms, so they enjoy the sight and fragrance of the roses. We talked about the roses and told them how much we appreciate all their work.

Third Stoppage - In the reception area a 92 year-old man was waiting for his wife's exam to be over. He wanted to know all about the roses I was growing. Soon he was talking about hybrid teas, grandifloras, and floribundas. I told him how many rose bushes we were growing, and he said, "I had 200 growing years ago."

 Europeana has brilliant color, plenty of bloms,
and excellent foliage. Rosarians love great foliage.


I tell Mrs. Ichabod that numbers like that are my new goal, but that is not true. A front yard full is quite enough for watering, pruning, and mulching.

He became overwhelmed with protecting them and spraying them all. "I don't spray for black spot."
He was struck, "What do you do with it?" I said, "It's no problem."

In the old days the rose growers were urged to spray for blackspot, spray for insects, apply many applications of chemical fertilizer. All three actions harmed the soil and killed off the beneficial insect population - not to mention the spiders. He mounded up soil for the winter, to protect each plant, which had to be a chore for 200 plants. He even cut the canes at the end of the season (?!) to predent something else - and it only makes them grow into the cold weather, which is not good.

I kept my poker face for all the methods that are made obsolete by a return to soil and insect care. We had a great conversation about favorite roses like Peace and Europeana.

Fourth Stoppage - His wife came out of the exam area and began talking to Mrs. Ichabod about the roses they grew. The couple was very healthy and articulate, cheerful and friendly. It was great fun to see them and converse with them before my wife's appointment, which came up at once.

 The Peace Rose opens as a yellow flower,
but the pink edges develop as it opens up.
Many Peace blooms are especially large, too.


The experience yesterday was another example of roses making people happy:

  • We enjoy the beauty and fragrance of the roses, in the front and backyard.
  • Neighbors tell us how much they enjoy our roses and the ones I have helped them start.
  • If we have an appointment anywhere, we take roses along. That always animates the recipients with their stories about roses, how much they love certain ones, and "how difficult roses are." 
  • I am compare notes with people, so they know they can grow roses without a lot of labor and expense.
  • Creation Gardening will show that foundational work on the soil and the beneficial creature population will make any effort much easier and rewarding, because the best way is God's way.