The Glory Has Departed


Norma Boeckler, Artist in Residence

Bethany Lutheran Worship on
Ustream


NT Greek Lessons - Thursdays, 7 PM.

Saved worship files and Greek lessons are at the live worship link.

email: greg.jackson.edlp@gmail.com,
which works as gregjacksonedlp@gmail.com too.

Luther's Sermons, Lenker Series
Book of Concord Selections
Bente's Historical Introductions,
and Martin Chemnitz Press Books

Friday, April 21, 2017

Rain, Rain, Stay a Day - The Creation Gardening Is Bursting with Life

Sweetheart Calladiums came from Florida Calladiums

Yesterday I planted the Calladiums that came in the mail. Almost every one was a triple, so they will put on a great display, with color matching the big Crepe Myrtle.

One bloom of the Crepe Myrtle displayed its color close-up.

 The lower half of the Crepe Myrtle was pruned
after the first bloom, which lasts a long time.
The upper half housed the Cardinal nest.
No one else prunes the first bloom, which gives color into late fall.

The new Crepe Myrtle twigs finally leafed out and began growing like weeds. Two are almost waist-high now.

The Mr. Lincoln roses popped new leaves four days after planting. I watered the new roses and Calladiums to give the little bulbs a start and the rose canes some extra moisture.

Nothing brings on rain like watering and visiting Walmart. By the time I was going to Walmart for medicine we had an afternoon of rain (scattered showers?) building up to a cloudburst when I went into the store and departed. Unlike the customers who bent their heads to avoid the rain - does that work? - I went in happy to have all the plants watered and fertilized.

The rain washes pollen out of the air, which was already coating cars like golden powder. I would not dismiss the added benefit of tree contributions to the soil. The pollen, leaves, and seeds add tons of organic matter, if only people would notice.

Almost Eden and I covet pine needles, so they are in short supply on our block.

I never know what a surprise rose will yield.

Another day of rain should leave standing water in the backyard, weeds reaching new heights, and the second rose garden in full bloom. Those roses get bonus rain-barrel water, so that gave them a jump. John Paul II was in full bloom. In the front, Easy Does It was completely in bloom, with bright orange flowers on short stems - typical of floribundas. Later the stems will be much longer. As readers recall from last summer, the Easy Does It ($5) roses would always have plenty of blooms to share.

Some buckwheat (not a grain!) should arrive today. Since that is sown, I will be out in the rain sprinkling the seeds in the butterfly garden, under the maple tree, and in the backyard.

Cat Mint mounds rather than taking over - at least I hope so.


One principle of beneficial insect plants is having them grow near the victims of insect pests. Therefore, I want various hosting plants close to the rose garden. Buckwheat will be in bloom quickly and for a long time. I have tiny mints from last year maturing and blooming already - Mountain Mint, Cat Mint, and Horse Mint.

Spirea Neon Flash - from Almost Eden

Another principle is having blooms open up at various times, besides having plants that seem to be ever-blooming. Contributions come from Crepe Myrtle, Spirea, clover, and dandelions (a herb!).

For the most part, adult beneficial insects need nectar and pollen, while the younglings feed on the pests, growing up where the livin is easy.

One of these mornings you're gonna rise up singing
And you'll spread your wings and you'll take to the sky
But 'til that morning, there ain't nothin' can harm you
With Daddy and Mammy standin' by.
Summertime - The Gershwins.

The mistake many gardeners make is killing all the insects and spiders with poison sprays and particles, when almost all of the creatures are beneficial. The toxin-gardeners also drive away other voracious and useful creatures, from the toads to the birds, none of which thrive on dead, poisoned insects.

One reader wants me to publish a second Creation Gardening book, and I am gathering photos to help that happen. My initial plan is to use the parables of Jesus as the basis for the booklet.

The retail site is here, but readers can obtain it for the author's price or less - by emailing.