Wednesday, March 6, 2013

Mid-Week Lenten Service



Mid-Week Lenten Vespers, March 6, 2013


Pastor Gregory L. Jackson


Bethany Lutheran Worship, 7 PM Central Time

The Hymn #227   Come Holy Ghost                 2. 72  
The Order of Vespers                                             p. 41
The Psalmody                   Psalm                          p. 128
The Lection                            The Passion History

The Sermon Hymn #249            Isaiah Mighty Seer            2.72  

The Sermon –      Isaiah’s Preaching of the Gospel
 
The Prayers
The Lord’s Prayer
The Collect for Grace                                            p. 45

The Hymn # 558                 All Praise                         2:9


KJV Isaiah 53:1 Who hath believed our report? and to whom is the arm of the LORD revealed? 2 For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him.

3 He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were our faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not. 4 Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted. 5 But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed.

6 All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the LORD hath laid on him the iniquity of us all. 7 He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth: he is brought as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so he openeth not his mouth.

8 He was taken from prison and from judgment: and who shall declare his generation? for he was cut off out of the land of the living: for the transgression of my people was he stricken. 9 And he made his grave with the wicked, and with the rich in his death; because he had done no violence, neither was any deceit in his mouth.

10 Yet it pleased the LORD to bruise him; he hath put him to grief: when thou shalt make his soul an offering for sin, he shall see his seed, he shall prolong his days, and the pleasure of the LORD shall prosper in his hand. 11 He shall see of the travail of his soul, and shall be satisfied: by his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many; for he shall bear their iniquities.

12 Therefore will I divide him a portion with the great, and he shall divide the spoil with the strong; because he hath poured out his soul unto death: and he was numbered with the transgressors; and he bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors.



Isaiah’s Preaching of the Gospel

KJV Isaiah 53:1 Who hath believed our report? and to whom is the arm of the LORD revealed?

This verse is a clear representation of the Gospel in a few words. This means we have both the proclamation of the truth and faith in that preaching.

The “report” as translated in Romans 10, in citing Isaiah 53, is a combination of preaching and hearing.

The Jackson Living KJV translates Romans 10:16 as

Who has believed the Word which is heard?

Isaiah 53 unfolds and Romans 10 completes it. The Passion of Christ was revealed centuries before, and Paul teaches – this atonement is preached and heard, so that all who believe in the Gospel are forgiven and saved. Their sins are washed away, removed forever, and this forgiveness continues as along as they abide in the True Vine (John 15) through the Means of Grace.

This righteousness of faith (in the words of Paul, Romans 10, is the result of proclaiming the atoning death of the Suffering Servant, from Isaiah 53.

KJV Romans 10:6 But the righteousness which is of faith speaketh on this wise, Say not in thine heart, Who shall ascend into heaven? (that is, to bring Christ down from above:)

There is the righteousness of the Law or the righteousness of faith. One opposes or displaces the other. If someone rejects the righteousness that comes from believing the Gospel, he lives under the righteousness of the Law.

2 For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him.

This verse only makes sense in light of the ministry of Christ, a prefiguring of the crucified Messiah. This is so clear that Isaiah 53 has been taught successfully in the conversions of Jews to the Gospel, since the chapter does everything except name Jesus as the topic of the passage.

So it is no surprise that Paul, the Jewish Pharisee who lived the righteousness of the Law, persecuting faith, found Isaiah 53 so harmonious with his message to the Romans. This was not simply the choice of Paul, but the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, showing how the Old Testament and the New Testament are one unified truth.

3 He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were our faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not. 4 Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted. 5 But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed.

Rationalists do not like this chapter, but believers find great comfort in it. These two verses describe the suffering of the Messiah, but it is suffering for a reason. Apart from the Gospel, the idea of the Servant suffering for others makes no sense. This falls outside of the ancient concept of the warrior king.

He has borne our griefs and carried our sorrows…

This is reflected in the atonement passages of 1 Corinthians, that Jesus took our sin upon Him so that we might receive His righteousness in faith.

This chapter is antiphonal in this sense – the facts are reported followed by the divinely-planned reason why they happened.

These events happened because…
  • He was wounded for our transgressions.
  • He was bruised for our iniquities.
  • The chastisement of our peace was upon Him.
  • And with His stripes we are healed.


6 All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the LORD hath laid on him the iniquity of us all. 7 He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth: he is brought as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so he openeth not his mouth.

Old Testament poetry beautifully explains one verse or one part of a verse with another. The same thought is repeated in different words, so we can understand from both parts. One example – The Lord is my Shepherd, which explains I shall not want.

This section gives us a picture of the Lamb who is sacrificed for our sins, yet we are the sheep. He is both Lamb and Good Shepherd, just as He is both victim and priest. (Hebrews is especially eloquent about Jesus as the High Priest.)

8 He was taken from prison and from judgment: and who shall declare his generation? for he was cut off out of the land of the living: for the transgression of my people was he stricken. 9 And he made his grave with the wicked, and with the rich in his death; because he had done no violence, neither was any deceit in his mouth.

This section says so much about the death and resurrection of Christ. This reveals His sinless nature, His divinity, and also the grave where He was placed. He died as a criminal but was buried in a new grave from a rich man, one never used before. (Lazarus prefigured this rising from the dead, showing how the Word could raise the dead.)

12 Therefore will I divide him a portion with the great, and he shall divide the spoil with the strong; because he hath poured out his soul unto death: and he was numbered with the transgressors; and he bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors.

The unity of the Scriptures can be seen in how this passage harmonizes with Christ teaching about the stronger man who takes over the possessions of the strong man (Satan) and takes away his spoils, sharing them.

The earth no longer belongs to Satan, who still rules the best he can until the end. Christ is the victor and calls all into His Kingdom by His Word. He has won the victory, which is ours by faith.

  


  

Quotations

"Other writings, however, of ancient or modern teachers, whatever name they bear, must not be regarded as equal to the Holy Scriptures, but all of them together be subjected to them, and should not be received otherwise or further than as witnesses, [which are to show] in what manner after the time of the apostles, and at what places, this [pure] doctrine of the prophets and apostles was preserved."
            Formula of Concord, Epitome, Part I, 2, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 777. Tappert, p. 465.                

"We believe, teach, and confess that the sole rule and standard according to which all dogmas together with [all] teachers should be estmated and judged are the prophetic and apostolic Scriptures of the Old and the New Testament alone, as it is written in Psalm 119:105:  'Thy Word is a lamp unto my feet and a light unto my path.'  And St. Paul:  'Though an angel from heaven preach any other gospel unto you, let him be accursed,' Galatians 1:8."         Formula of Concord, Epitome, Part I, 1, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 777. Tappert, p. 464. Psalm 119:105; Galatians 1:8.              

"Therefore, before the conversion of man there are only two efficient causes, namely, the Holy Ghost and the Word of God, as the instrument of the Holy Ghost, by which He works conversion.  This Word man is [indeed] to hear; however, it is not by his own powers, but only through the grace and working of the Holy Ghost that he can yield faith to it and accept it." Formula of Concord, Epitome, II, Of the Free Will, #19, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 791. Tappert, p. 472. 
                 
"This power {the Keys} is exercised only by teaching or preaching the Gospel and administering the Sacraments, according to their calling, either to many or to individuals.  For thereby are granted, not bodily, but eternal things, as eternal righteousness, the Holy Ghost, eternal life.  These things cannot come but by the ministry of the Word and the Sacraments, as Paul says, Romans 1:16:  The Gospel is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth.  Therefore, since the power of the Church grants eternal things, and is exercised only by the ministry of the Word, it does not interfere with civil government; no more than the art of singing interferes with civil government."
            Augsburg Confession, Article XXVIII, #8, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 85. Tappert, p. 82. Romans 1:16        

"For this reason we shall now relate, furthermore, from God's Word how man is converted to God, how and through what means [namely, through the oral Word and the holy Sacraments] the Holy Ghost wants to be efficacious in us, and to work and bestow in our hearts true repentance, faith, and new spiritual power and ability for good, and how we should conduct ourselves towards these means, and [how we should] use them."
            Solid Declaration, Article II, Free Will, 48, Formula of Concord, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 901. Tappert, p. 530.                

"Therefore God, out of His immense goodness and mercy, has His divine eternal Law and His wonderful plan concerning our redemption, namely, the holy, alone‑saving Gospel of His eternal Son, our only Savior and Redeemer, Jesus Christ, publicly preached; and by this [preaching] collects an eternal Church for Himself from the human race, and works in the hearts of men true repentance and knowledge of sins, and true faith in the Son of God, Jesus Christ.  And by this means, and in no other way, namely, through His holy Word, when men hear it preached or read it, and the holy Sacraments when they are used according to His Word, God desires to call men to eternal salvation, draw them to Himself, and convert, regenerate, and sanctify them.  1 Corinthians 1:21:  'For after that in the wisdom of God the world by wisdom knew not God, it pleased God by the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe.'  Acts 10:5‑6..."
            Solid Declaration, Article II, Free Will, #50, Formula of Concord, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 901. Tappert, p. 530f. 1 Corinthians 1:21; Acts 10:5‑6.  

"Now, although both, the planting and watering of the preacher, and the running and willing of the hearer, would be in vain, and no conversion would follow it if the power and efficacy of the Holy Ghost were not added thereto, who enlightens and converts the hearts through the Word preached and heard, so that men believe this Word and assent thereto, still, neither preacher nor hearer is to doubt this grace and efficacy of the Holy Ghost, but should be certain that when the Word of God is preached purely and truly, according to the command and will of God, and men listen attentively and earnestly and meditate upon it, God is certainly present with His grace, and grants, as has been said, what otherwise man can neither accept nor give from his own powers."            
Solid Declaration, Article II, Free Will, 55‑56, Formula of Concord, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 903. Tappert, p. 531f.        

"Is the Lord's Supper the place to display my toleration, my Christian sympathy, or my fellowship with another Christian, when that is the very point in which most of all we differ; and in which the difference means for me everything‑‑means for me, the reception of the Savior's atonement?  Is this the point to be selected for the display of Christian union, when in fact it is the very point in which Christian union does not exist?"
            Theodore E. Schmauk and C. Theodore Benze, The Confessional Principle and the Confessions, as Embodying the Evangelical Confession of the Christian Church, Philadelphia: 1911, p. 905f.        
        
"Another defect of Reformed preaching is its contempt for the Means of Grace.  They will tell you that the Holy Spirit needs no vehicle, neither ox‑cart nor aeroplane, to enter the heart of man; and by this rationalistic argument they think to have done away with the Means of Grace.  But notice how they set about immediately to construct their own Means of Grace.  Luther told them in his day:'If the Holy Spirit needs no vehicle, no preaching, then why are you here?  And why are you so earnest in spreading your errors?  It seems that what you really meant to say was that the Holy Spirit does not need true prophets, but He is very much in need of false prophets.' If the Holy Spirit needs no Means of Grace, who do these Reformed churches undertake their campaigns of revivalism?"
            Martin S. Sommer, Concordia Pulpit for 1932, Martin S. Sommer, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1931, p. iv.      

"Transubstantiation is also one of the pillars that support the papalist kingdom...Rather, it is that they may retain and establish the sacrifice of the Mass, reservation, carrying about, adoration of the bread, and all the things which, outside of the divinely instituted use, have been joined to these things‑‑for this reason they fight so persistently about transubstantiation."
            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1986, II,  p. 253.                  

"For Scripture never calls either Baptism or the Lord's Supper mysteries or sacraments.  Therefore this is an unwritten (agraphos) appellation."
            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1986, II,  p. 29.    

"They imagine that by means of these actions, motions, gestures, and ceremonies, with certain words added about sacrifice, oblation, and victim, they are sacrificing and offering the body and blood of Christ, yes, Christ, the Son of God Himself, anew to God the Father through such a theatrical representation (which is either a comedy or a tragedy) of Christ's passion."
            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1986, II,  p. 446.                  

"To institute a form of worship beside and without the Word of God, and indeed one to which is ascribed propitiation for sins, appeasement of the wrath of God, is a vain thing; it cannot please God; yes, it is idolatry.  For 'in vain they worship Me with doctrines and commandments of men.'  Likewise: 'Without faith it is impossible that a thing should please God.'  Faith, however, 'comes by hearing, and hearing by the revealed Word of God.'"
            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1986, II,  p. 493.                

"That it lacks true, firm, and solid grounds in Scripture is, however, not the only thing we criticize in the papalist Mass; what we complain about most of all is that it is an abomination, conflicting with the doctrine of the Word, the sacraments, and faith‑‑yes, that it is full of abuse against the unique sacrifice of Christ and against His perpetual priesthood, as this has been demonstrated at length by the men on our side in fair and honest writings."
            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1986, II,  p. 493.                

"The papalist Mass, as we have described it in the beginning, militates against the one propitiatory sacrifice of Christ in many ways and is an affront to it.  For there is only one propitiatory sacrifice that expiates and renders satisfaction for sins‑‑the offering of Christ made on the cross (Hebrews 7:27; 9:12, 26; 10:12)."
            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1986, II,  p. 494.                  


"The papalist Mass, as we have described it in the beginning, militates against the one propitiatory sacrifice of Christ in many ways and is an affront to it.  For there is only one propitiatory sacrifice that expiates and renders satisfaction for sins‑‑the offering of Christ made on the cross (Hebrews 7:27; 9:12, 26; 10:12)."
            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1986, II,  p. 494.                  

"In addition there is this perversion, that whereas Christ instituted the use of His Supper for all who receive it, who take, eat, and drink, the papalist Mass transfers the use and benefit of the celebration of the Lord's Supper in our time to the onlookers, who do not communicate, yes, to those who are absent, and even to the dead."
            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1986, II,  p. 498.                  

"In addition there is this perversion, that whereas Christ instituted the use of His Supper for all who receive it, who take, eat, and drink, the papalist Mass transfers the use and benefit of the celebration of the Lord's Supper in our time to the onlookers, who do not communicate, yes, to those who are absent, and even to the dead."
            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1986, II,  p. 498.                  

"If anyone says that the canon of the Mass contains errors and should therefore be abrogated, let him be anathema."  [Chapter IV, Canon VI] Chemnitz:  "The power, yes, the substance and as it were the soul of the papalist sacrifice is the canon of the Mass.  Therefore they labor much more for its retention than about the canon of Scripture itself, which they are not afraid to corrupt by mixing in other, noncanonical books."
            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis:  Concordia Publishing House, 1986, II,  p. 508.             

Post a Comment