The Glory Has Departed


Norma Boeckler, Artist in Residence

Bethany Lutheran Worship on
Ustream


NT Greek Lessons - Thursdays, 7 PM.

Saved worship files and Greek lessons are at the live worship link.

email: greg.jackson.edlp@gmail.com,
which works as gregjacksonedlp@gmail.com too.

Luther's Sermons, Lenker Series
Book of Concord Selections
Bente's Historical Introductions,
and Martin Chemnitz Press Books

Sunday, June 18, 2017

The First Sunday after Trinity, 2017. Luke 16:19-31

 "To Abrahm's bosom bear me home."
http://ichabodthegloryhasdeparted.blogspot.com/2013/04/norma-boecklers-new-book-treasury-of.html


The First Sunday after Trinity, 2017



The melodies are linked in the hymn name. 
The lyrics are linked in the hymn number.


The Hymn # 427                            How Firm a Foundation                 
The Confession of Sins
The Absolution
The Introit p. 16
The Gloria Patri
The Kyrie p. 17
The Gloria in Excelsis
The Salutation and Collect p. 19
The Epistle and Gradual       
The Gospel              
Glory be to Thee, O Lord!
Praise be to Thee, O Christ!
The Nicene Creed             p. 22
The Sermon Hymn #429                     Lord, Thee I Love            

Faith with Nothing - Better Than Riches


The Communion Hymn # 311             Jesus Christ               
The Preface p. 24
The Sanctus p. 26
The Lord's Prayer p. 27
The Words of Institution
The Agnus Dei p. 28
The Nunc Dimittis p. 29
The Benediction p. 31
The Hymn #50                                 Lord Dismiss Us                    




KJV 1 John 4:16 And we have known and believed the love that God hath to us. God is love; and he that dwelleth in love dwelleth in God, and God in him. 17 Herein is our love made perfect, that we may have boldness in the day of judgment: because as he is, so are we in this world. 18 There is no fear in love; but perfect love casteth out fear: because fear hath torment. He that feareth is not made perfect in love. 19 We love him, because he first loved us. 20 If a man say, I love God, and hateth his brother, he is a liar: for he that loveth not his brother whom he hath seen, how can he love God whom he hath not seen? 21 And this commandment have we from him, That he who loveth God love his brother also.

KJV Luke 16:19 There was a certain rich man, which was clothed in purple and fine linen, and fared sumptuously every day: 20 And there was a certain beggar named Lazarus, which was laid at his gate, full of sores, 21 And desiring to be fed with the crumbs which fell from the rich man's table: moreover the dogs came and licked his sores. 22 And it came to pass, that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom: the rich man also died, and was buried; 23 And in hell he lift up his eyes, being in torments, and seeth Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom. 24 And he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this flame. 25 But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime receivedst thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented. 26 And beside all this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed: so that they which would pass from hence to you cannot; neither can they pass to us, that would come from thence. 27 Then he said, I pray thee therefore, father, that thou wouldest send him to my father's house: 28 For I have five brethren; that he may testify unto them, lest they also come into this place of torment. 29 Abraham saith unto him, They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them. 30 And he said, Nay, father Abraham: but if one went unto them from the dead, they will repent. 31 And he said unto him, If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded, though one rose from the dead.

First Sunday After Trinity

Lord God, heavenly Father, we beseech Thee so to rule and govern our hearts by Thy Holy Spirit, that we may not, like the rich man, hear Thy word in vain, and become so devoted to things temporal as to forget things eternal; but that we readily and according to our ability minister to such as are in need, and not defile ourselves with surfeiting and pride; in trial and misfortune keep us from despair, and grant us to put our trust wholly in Thy fatherly help and grace, so that in faith and Christian patience we may overcome all things, through Thy Son, Jesus Christ, our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with Thee and the Holy Ghost, one true God, world without end. Amen.

Luther’s Sermon on the Rich Man and Lazarus

 Nothing better describes the clergy of today
than this passage from Luther.

Faith with Nothing - Better Than Riches


KJV Luke 16:19 There was a certain rich man, which was clothed in purple and fine linen, and fared sumptuously every day:

Jesus told the parable of the rich man and Lazarus by starting - "a certain rich man." The rich man has no name, but the poor man does - Lazarus. Thus the contrast shows us that one man is known by name in heaven and the other is anonymous. This parable is packed with significant details. This rich man was clothed in the linen of wealthy people and it was dyed purple, which reminded everyone he could afford this rare color. No diet for him - he dined luxuriously every day, nothing but the best, and plenty of it. Left unsaid is how popular this rich man was, but no outward sin is attached to him. That would have been mentioned. We all realize that someone so obviously wealthy, well dressed, and well fed would be admired by many and visited by all the Planned Giving Counselors of the time.

Some may know that fund-raising is an ancient art. In Judaism, the fund-raiser has a title and a commission rate. His prosperity depends upon how much money he raises for the temple or similar charities. The Planned Giving Counselors of Lutherdom work the same way, as licensed insurance agents earning a commission from their sales. 

The rich man is notable in that nothing against him is listed. He would be welcome and admired in any community. Thus Jesus begins the comparison between no faith and faith.

20 And there was a certain beggar named Lazarus, which was laid at his gate, full of sores, 21 And desiring to be fed with the crumbs which fell from the rich man's table: moreover the dogs came and licked his sores.

The beggar has a name - Lazarus. Some kindly souls placed him where he might obtain some help, right at the gate where the rich man passed, along with his servants and those who came to call on him. He was full of sores, the blight of long-term illness when the skin breaks down. His hope was that some food might come his way, but that never happened. The plight of Lazarus is shown with the scavenger dogs of the street, loathed by proper people, licking his sores to provide some comfort. Dogs detect infections, even cancer, and God created them to show love and concern for humans.

Lenski Commentary:
It is this naming of the beggar that leads many to think that both men were real. Although it is exceptional in a parable, this common name seems to be symbolical, "God a help." It is shortened from Eleazaros and, stated right at the start, marks this man as being one who put all his trust and faith in God. And now we have the connection of these two men: "he had been thrown, dumped, at his portal," the grand, wide entrance through the wall that opened into the spacious courtyard of the rich man's palace; had been dumped and was now lying there. He could not move himself even on crutches and those who carried his diseased body just dropped it down regardless of the groan of pain they caused. Through that portal the rich man and his friends had to pass, had to see him in his wretchedness, had to hear his quavering, begging voice as he stretched out his hand. That is why he was put there — a golden opportunity for alms and for more than alms. "Disgusting!" thought the rich man. Not one of the Old Testament statements about helping the helpless even entered his mind, and his following imitated him. One word, a perfect participle, thus describing his present state, explains the dumping at this place: "suffering from ulcers," loathsome, festering, painful, untended sores.

The bulk of the parable teaches us the meaning of these two men, one an unbeliever, the other a believer. Some books raise the issue of whether these were two individuals known to Jesus. While that would be easy to imagine, even now, the comparison is universal in nature and the lesson for all people. 

For here we see the judgment of God upon the believers and the unbelievers, which is both dreadful and comforting. Dreadful to the faithless and comforting to the faithful. But in order that we may the better grasp the meaning of this text we must picture to ourselves both the rich man and poor Lazarus. In the rich man we see the nature of unbelief and in Lazarus the nature of belief.

22 And it came to pass, that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom: the rich man also died, and was buried; 23 And in hell he lift up his eyes, being in torments, and seeth Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom.

The outward state of both men disappears as their souls are revealed. The beggar died and was carried to Abraham's bosom, so he was a believer. But the rich man died and went to Hell, in torment, and knew Lazarus was at peace with Abraham.

Jesus said in John 724 "Judge not according to the appearance, but judge righteous judgment." (not with the eyes)

The Bible consistently condemns judging by appearance, which is all we see in the institutional church. They are told, "Whatever you do will be forgiven. Your enemies will be our enemies. God will forgive you for destroying your family and scoffing at your marital vows, if only you sign this irrevocable charitable gift. Amen. So let it be."

But the rich man is not condemned for a life of hedonism, in the worst sense, but for lacking in that faith which makes us aware of our neighbor's needs. This parable promises so much for someone who wants to raise up Social Justice Warriors (SJWs in common parlance) and "make the world a better place," phrases used when the Gospel is turned into Law. 

In studying the apostasy of American Christianity, I have seen the various church bodies become braggarts about all the good they do while having nothing to say about faith in the Gospel of Jesus Christ. After seeing a reference to Marble Collegiate Church in NYC, I looked up a video about them. They are completely Antinomian now, extremely Left wing, but they have an endless list of examples of their compassion. Works have become the gospel for the apostates.

False teachers are also defended the same way - "Look at all the good he has done!" My recent favorite is - "He listens to Confessional Lutherans." My, how far we have sunk when tolerating an opposing perspective is a mark of virtue. I listen to Mormons, to refute their false gospel.

But in all these cases listed above, faith in Christ arouses anger and bitterness, cries of discrimination, injustice, bigotry, and more. 

24 And he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this flame. 25 But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime receivedst thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented. 26 And beside all this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed: so that they which would pass from hence to you cannot; neither can they pass to us, that would come from thence.

Jesus vividly describes the rich man's plight. The rich man, who never did anything for Lazarus at his gate, now begs for the least favor from Lazarus, to cool his tongue with a few drops of water. I was in a class once, not listening the Cisco technology, and all I could do was dream about the break and some cold water. I mapped out where I would walk and made sure I had money to buy the water - one, no two bottles. 

Abraham reminds the rich man that once he enjoyed all the good things of life and Lazarus all the evil. As Luther commented, the rich man could have had his servants care for the beggar, but nothing happened. Such are the ways of people like that, Lazarus was probably loathed even more just for being there, hardening their hearts rather than promoting some warmth, concern, and compassion.

The first part of the reminded is bitter enough, but there is more. No one can travel from one world to the next. In spite of all the tall tales from the Roman Catholics, about spirits from Purgatory helping, there is a gulf that cannot be bridged.

27 Then he said, I pray thee therefore, father, that thou wouldest send him to my father's house: 28 For I have five brethren; that he may testify unto them, lest they also come into this place of torment.

Now there is sudden compassion for his brothers. The rich man now wants to make Lazarus into an apostle, speaking the Gospel to his brothers, an impressive feat for one from the dead. This is great irony because this same scenario will be played out in the future. Jesus the despised Lazarus, who comes back from the dead to preach the Gospel and lead His followers through the Holy Spirit. Even the apostates will - at times - admit to the resurrection of Christ. Surely they would convince anyone.

This plea is also a perfect duplication of what we hear today. The manipulative messages make it appear as if everyone must reduce the number of the lost. Banners are put up in church to make people feel guilty. But Christ emphasized faith in Him, not numbers. Few are urged to broadcast the Gospel Word as much as possible, trusting in the efficacy of the Word. Instead, they are urged to save as many as possible, trusting in their own powers.

"I have five brothers - count the unsaved." But where was the proclamation of the Word when the opportunities were there for the rich man?

The Rich Man Today - The SP
The rich man today is the Synod President, who lets the seminarians take on a mountain of debt with the hopes of receiving a call and not being fired by the DP. A Lutheran college can cost $80,000 and LCMS seminary $100,000 - with some grants made to reduce the total. The SPs all say, "Too bad, sonny boy. You have to take on debt because we will not support our seminaries or our students. But look at the beeyootiful shiny buildings we put up for you ingrates! Smell the carpeting in the expanded and refurbished library that you no longer need to use.Thank us for all the steak dinners we enjoyed while begging the rich to support you."

These SPs give themselves enormous salaries and benefits for doing no worthwhile work at all. They do not preach or visit - except to stop legal actions and bad publicity. They ban discussion about doctrine, which is their specialty - false doctrine, that is. Discussion means excommunication and no job. They drive pastors into poverty and despise them for being exiled and impoverished. The rich SP is an unbeliever.


29 Abraham saith unto him, They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them. 

This is one of the clearest Biblical passages about the efficacy of the Word. There is no emphasis on what the rich man should have done or what others should be doing. The brothers have the Word of God in Moses and the prophets. Those who listen in sincerity and faith will receive that saving message. But there are those, who trained in their own holiness or in rationalism, will hear and yet not listen. The more they see, the blinder they are. Chemnitz' words are very good on this issue.

That is also why so many Jews believe in Christ today. They have all the background, the foundation, for faith in Christ.

30 And he said, Nay, father Abraham: but if one went unto them from the dead, they will repent. 31 And he said unto him, If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded, though one rose from the dead.

This conclusion is the final attack on the clown and circus ministries offered in so many places. If only we could entice them, bait them with fun and games and fast food. What works so well in the world of mammon has the opposite effect in spiritual matters. That may work for a time, but the superficiality is the base for their collapse.

The famous Lutheran Church of Joy (Phoenix) finally gave up their emphasis on professional entertainment each Sunday. When they did, the entire congregation collapsed and they merged into an Assemblies of God church. That is not surprising when they promoted a future water park rather than Holy Baptism.



Poke Weeds
Birds love Pokeberries more than any other food, and they plant it everywhere, so this prolific plant is bound to spread - and prosper as a perennial. So people look down on it and do their best to remove it.

When I finally discovered what this odd plant was, I cut it down, especially when it reached 9 feet in height and spread its branches almost as wide. Meanwhile, I bought birdfood and planted berries, mostly for birds.

Looking through a large book on attracting birds, Poke was listed as the favorite berry of birds. My attitude began to change. This is a free and productive birdfeeder.

Beneficial insects like certain flowers. Poke was on that list too, with photographs proving their popularity with the insects that feast on pests.

More reading led to the concept of deep roots penetrating far into the soil - and producing organic matter for the soil. Some bizarre plants are grown on farmland to reach into the subsoil. They also help store rainwater, by taking rain and snowmelt down those channels instead of running off.

So now I had a birdfeeder that attracted beneficial insects while vastly improving the soil. But wait there's more.

Poke is also a medicinal plant, used in various ways, such as treatment of arthritis.

Here is the comparison. Many look upon faith in Christ as a problem, something to be removed. At the very least, it is scoffed at. At the worst, it is violently persecuted and silenced whenever possible. But Jesus shows us that the beggar Lazarus is the teacher and the rich man, when it is too late, is the beggar.

Faith is always the beginning of good works, so we can see that the people featured in the teaching of Jesus were people with faith in Him. Abraham was the first, who believed God's Promise that his line would produce the Savior of the world, that he would be the one and only "father of nations." Likewise, Moses and the prophets, and David held up that Promise as well.

Faith in Christ is the foundation of blessings that flow to our family, friends, and neighbors. In contrast, unbelief accomplishes nothing lasting but leads to despair, fear, and insecurity.