The Glory Has Departed


Norma Boeckler, Artist-in-Residence

Bethany Lutheran Worship on
Ustream


NT Greek Lessons - Thursdays, 7 PM.

Saved worship files and Greek lessons are at the live worship link.

email: greg.jackson.edlp@gmail.com,
which works as gregjacksonedlp@gmail.com too.

Luther's Sermons, Lenker Series
Book of Concord Selections
Bente's Historical Introductions,
and Martin Chemnitz Press Books

Sunday, April 21, 2013

Jubilate - The Third Sunday in Easter. John 16:16-23.
A Little While

The Empty Tomb, by Norma Boeckler



Jubilate, The Third Sunday of Easter, 2013


Pastor Gregory L. Jackson




The Hymn #  536     Awake My Soul  3.28
The Confession of Sins
The Absolution
The Introit p. 16
The Gloria Patri
The Kyrie p. 17
The Gloria in Excelsis
The Salutation and Collect p. 19
The Epistle and Gradual       
The Gospel              
Glory be to Thee, O Lord!
Praise be to Thee, O Christ!
The Nicene Creed p. 22
The Sermon Hymn # 36            Now Thank We            3.40

 A Little While

The Communion Hymn # 354            In the Cross 3.84
The Preface p. 24
The Sanctus p. 26
The Lord's Prayer p. 27
The Words of Institution
The Agnus Dei p. 28
The Nunc Dimittis p. 29
The Benediction p. 31
The Hymn #231 We Now Implore                           3.38 

THIRD SUNDAY OF EASTER

Lord God, heavenly Father, who of Thy fatherly goodness dost suffer Thy children to come under Thy chastening rod here on earth, that we may be like unto Thine only-begotten Son in suffering and hereafter in glory: We beseech Thee, comfort us in temptations and afflictions by Thy Holy Spirit, that we may not fall into despair, but that we may continually trust in Thy Son's promise, that our trials will endure but a little while, and will then be followed by eternal joy; that we thus, in patient hope, may overcome all evil, and at last obtain eternal salvation, through the same, Thy Son, Jesus Christ, our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with Thee and the Holy Ghost, one true God, world without end. Amen.

KJV 1 Peter 2:11 Dearly beloved, I beseech you as strangers and pilgrims, abstain from fleshly lusts, which war against the soul; 12 Having your conversation honest among the Gentiles: that, whereas they speak against you as evildoers, they may by your good works, which they shall behold, glorify God in the day of visitation. 13 Submit yourselves to every ordinance of man for the Lord's sake: whether it be to the king, as supreme; 14 Or unto governors, as unto them that are sent by him for the punishment of evildoers, and for the praise of them that do well. 15 For so is the will of God, that with well doing ye may put to silence the ignorance of foolish men: 16 As free, and not using your liberty for a cloke of maliciousness, but as the servants of God. 17 Honour all men. Love the brotherhood. Fear God. Honour the king. 18 Servants, be subject to your masters with all fear; not only to the good and gentle, but also to the froward. 19 For this is thankworthy, if a man for conscience toward God endure grief, suffering wrongfully. 20 For what glory is it, if, when ye be buffeted for your faults, ye shall take it patiently? but if, when ye do well, and suffer for it, ye take it patiently, this is acceptable with God.

KJV John 16:16 A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a little while, and ye shall see me, because I go to the Father. 17 Then said some of his disciples among themselves, What is this that he saith unto us, A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a little while, and ye shall see me: and, Because I go to the Father? 18 They said therefore, What is this that he saith, A little while? we cannot tell what he saith. 19 Now Jesus knew that they were desirous to ask him, and said unto them, Do ye enquire among yourselves of that I said, A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a little while, and ye shall see me? 20 Verily, verily, I say unto you, That ye shall weep and lament, but the world shall rejoice: and ye shall be sorrowful, but your sorrow shall be turned into joy. 21 A woman when she is in travail hath sorrow, because her hour is come: but as soon as she is delivered of the child, she remembereth no more the anguish, for joy that a man is born into the world. 22 And ye now therefore have sorrow: but I will see you again, and your heart shall rejoice, and your joy no man taketh from you. 23 And in that day ye shall ask me nothing. Verily, verily, I say unto you, Whatsoever ye shall ask the Father in my name, he will give it you.





A Little While


KJV John 16:16 A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a little while, and ye shall see me, because I go to the Father.

This is a remarkable conversation because the same words are used so many times and then explained. As I have mentioned in the past, the Bible is quite concise, so every detail is important.

When the Bible repeats or gives many examples, it is especially important.

This passage is impossible to forget because of the repetition. I wonder if it was used as a short catechism about difficult times. When language students translate it, they laugh because they translate the same words so many times in a row. Luther commented on this too, saying it was even a bit annoying.

The overall theme is dealing with the devastation of Jesus’ death, when everyone was dashed and terrified, locked up in a room, afraid of their opponents, even a week after they saw the risen Lord (except for Thomas, who was not exactly a shining example).

17 Then said some of his disciples among themselves, What is this that he saith unto us, A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a little while, and ye shall see me: and, Because I go to the Father?

Even though the disciples were prepared carefully by their Master, they did not grasp His complete mission. They had the specific prediction of His death and resurrection.

We all experience that when we know something but do not understand the complete impact of it until the reality strikes us. On a national level, no one has experienced the new medical laws, even though they are in writing and explained in many different places. The reason is that the actual experiences have not begun yet. As reality begins to strike those who voted for it, fear of the consequences dominates their thinking. Companies are announcing their future layoffs and unions are asking to opt out of the plan altogether.

So this was explained in advance and still the disciples only saw and experienced the worst when it happened. Faith almost vanished as fear took over.

18 They said therefore, What is this that he saith, A little while? we cannot tell what he saith. 19 Now Jesus knew that they were desirous to ask him, and said unto them, Do ye enquire among yourselves of that I said, A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a little while, and ye shall see me?

The larger theme of this lesson is this – just as the disciples experienced this after the death of Jesus, so we go through similar times of devastation, doubt, and fear.

Knowing that their despair turned into joy, we can cling to this reality – that although everything seems gloomy at the moment, and that gloom seems to last far too long, there is an answer, a solution from God in the future.

So this is my conclusion – we are to think of this episode, dwell on it, when we have those difficult periods in life. This is an important lesson, so important that the words are repeated again and again.



A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a little while, and ye shall see me?

Not seeing Jesus can also be understood as not experiencing the joy of the Christian faith and those benefits. We would love to have all the good things continue forever and the bad things go away immediately.

Even though we grow in spiritual wisdom with the study of the Word, new challenges face us because each stage of life has its own difficulties. Not only that, the worst apostates seem to float along in great prosperity while others suffer for being faithful.

The difficulties and tragedies of life come our way. As Luther observed, Satan works on us with the long continuation of those difficulties. This is especially true with opposition to the Gospel. Just when something is resolved, after a few days, it seems, it starts all over again – even on the same topic.

I told several people how tiresome the topic of UOJ was, especially when someone would start anew and say, “Explain why UOJ is wrong.” If I suggested a book for two or a few hundred posts, the reply would be, “No, I need it explained all over again.” Many times someone would take over and explain matters in different words.

It is not the writing and the debating that is difficult but the feeling that it is a fruitless effort when the same false arguments are used verbatim. And yet, this very opposition causes people to see the light of justification by faith.

This opposition makes us want to read the Apology of the Augsburg Confession and appreciate how that long section on justification is really a brilliant essay on the meaning of Romans and Galatians.

20 Verily, verily, I say unto you, That ye shall weep and lament, but the world shall rejoice: and ye shall be sorrowful, but your sorrow shall be turned into joy. 21 A woman when she is in travail hath sorrow, because her hour is come: but as soon as she is delivered of the child, she remembereth no more the anguish, for joy that a man is born into the world.

Who can forget this parable of childbirth, which is called labor for a good reason.
It is true physical anguish and fraught with dangers. Everyone involved wants it to be over, to have all fears and pain calmed. But when it is over, all that trouble is worthwhile with the birth of a child.

God made babies reward their parents with a super-abundance of charm and love. Every single day the baby has something to reward the parents – new ability, that first smile, looking like one side of the family or the other, cooing. Shakespeare summed it up as “mewing and puking babes.”

Mothers say, “When will they ever grow up?” and then “I miss my little ones.”

Difficulties are the same kind of anguish, and they are similar to childbirth. First – when will be over? And then – when God seems to smile again – although His grace is never absent – “That was fun” – overcoming, enduring, learning, or perhaps becoming more empathetic.

Luther correctly identified Paul’s thorn in the flesh as emotional rather than physical, because 99% of all pain is emotional rather than physical – and is not said to diminish physical pain or limitations. Milton said the mind can make a heaven out of hell or a hell out of heaven.

The difference is faith. The believer trusts in the One who oversees all and shows His love through Christ. Gerhardt expressed it many different ways, always with great simplicity and charm. But he did so because he lived it. One tribute said he was sifted by Satan. If you know flour, you know that the sifting makes it soft and silky, taking out the lumps.









"Commit Whatever Grieves Thee" by Paul Gerhardt, 1607-1676

1. Commit whatever grieves thee
Into the gracious hands
Of Him who never leaves thee,
Who heaven and earth commands.
Who points the clouds their courses,
Whom winds and waves obey,
He will direct thy footsteps
And find for thee a way.


2. On Him place thy reliance
If thou wouldst be secure;
His work thou must consider
If thine is to endure.
By anxious sighs and grieving
And self-tormenting care
God is not moved to giving;
All must be gained by prayer.


3. Thy truth and grace, O Father,
Most surely see and know
Both what is good and evil
For mortal man below.
According to Thy counsel
Thou wilt Thy work pursue;
And what Thy wisdom chooseth
Thy might will always do.

4. Thy hand is never shortened,
All things must serve Thy might;
Thine every act is blessing,
Thy path is purest light.
Thy work no man can hinder,
Thy purpose none can stay,
Since Thou to bless Thy children
Wilt always find a way.


5. Though all the powers of evil
The will of God oppose,
His purpose will not falter,
His pleasure onward goes.
Whate'er God's will resolveth,
Whatever He intends.
Will always be accomplished
True to His aims and ends.


6. Then hope, my feeble spirit,
And be thou undismayed;
God helps in every trial
And makes thee unafraid.
Await His time with patience,
Then shall thine eyes behold
The sun of joy and gladness
His brightest beams unfold.


7. Arise, my soul, and banish
Thy anguish and thy care.
Away with thoughts that sadden
And heart and mind ensnare!
Thou art not lord and master
Of thine own destiny;
Enthroned in highest heaven,
God rules in equity.


8. Leave all to His direction;
In wisdom He doth reign,
And in a way most wondrous
His course He will maintain.
Soon He, His promise keeping,
With wonder-working skill,
Shall put away the sorrows
That now thy spirit fill.


9. A while His consolation
He may to thee deny,
And seem as though in trial
He far from thee would fly;
A while distress and anguish
May compass thee around,
Nor to thy supplication
An answering voice be found.


10. But if thou perseverest,
Thou shalt deliverance find.
Behold, all unexpected
He will thy soul unbind
And from the heavy burden
Thy heart will soon set free;
And thou wilt see the blessing
He had in mind for thee.


11. O faithful child of heaven,
How blessed shalt thou be!
With songs of glad thanksgiving
A crown awaiteth thee.
Into thy hand thy Maker
Will give the victor's palm.
And thou to thy Deliverer
Shalt sing a joyous psalm.


12. Give, Lord, this consummation
To all our heart's distress;
Our hands, our feet, e'er strengthen,
In death our spirits bless.
Thy truth and Thy protection
Grant evermore, we pray,
And in celestial glory
Shall end our destined way.


Hymn #520 
The Lutheran Hymnal
Text: Ps. 37: 5
Author: Paul Gerhardt, 1656
Translated by: composite
Titled: Befiehl du deine Wege
Composer: Hans L. Hassler, 1601
Tune: Herzlich tut mich




"Why Should Cross and Trial Grieve Me?"
by Paul Gerhardt, 1607-1676

1. Why should cross and trial grieve me?
Christ is near With His cheer;
Never will He leave me.
Who can rob me of the heaven
That God's Son For my own
To my faith hath given?


2. Though a heavy cross I'm bearing
And my heart Feels the smart,
Shall I be despairing?
God, my Helper, who doth send it,
Well doth know All my woe
And how best to end it.


3. God oft gives me days of gladness;
Shall I grieve If He give
Seasons, too, of sadness?
God is good and tempers ever
All my ill, And He will
Wholly leave me never.


4. Hopeful, cheerful, and undaunted
Everywhere They appear
Who in Christ are planted.
Death itself cannot appal them,
They rejoice When the voice
Of their Lord doth call them.


5. Death cannot destroy forever;
From our fears, Cares, and tears
It will us deliver.
It will close life's mournful story,
Make a way That we may
Enter heavenly glory.


6. What is all this life possesses?
But a hand Full of sand
That the heart distresses.
Noble gifts that pall me never
Christ, our Lord, Will accord
To His saints forever.


7. Lord, my Shepherd, take me to Thee.
Thou art mine; I was Thine,
Even e'er I knew Thee.
I am Thine, for Thou hast bought me;
Lost I stood, But Thy blood
Free salvation brought me.


8. Thou art mine; I love and own Thee.
Light of Joy, Ne'er shall I
From my heart dethrone Thee.
Savior, let me soon behold Thee
Face to face, -May Thy grace
Evermore enfold me!


Hymn #523 
The Lutheran Hymnal
Text: Ps. 73: 23
Author: Paul Gerhardt
Translated by: composite, based on John Kelly, 1867
Titled: Warum sollt' ich mich denn graemen
Composer: Johann G. Ebeling, 1666
Tune: Warum sollt' ich mich denn graemen

--
 
"If God Himself Be for Me"
by Paul Gerhardt, 1607-1676

1. If God Himself be for me,
I may a host defy;
For when I pray, before me
My foes, confounded, fly.
If Christ, my Head and Master,
Befriend me from above,
What foe or what disaster
Can drive me from His love?


2. This I believe, yea, rather,
Of this I make my boast,
That God is my dear Father,
The Friend who loves me most,
And that, whate'er betide me,
My Savior is at hand
Through stormy seas to guide me
And bring me safe to land.


3. I build on this foundation,
That Jesus and His blood
Alone are my salvation,
The true, eternal good.
Without Him all that pleases
Is valueless on earth;
The gifts I owe to Jesus
Alone my love are worth.


4. My Jesus is my Splendor,
My Sun, my Light, alone;
Were He not my Defender
Before God's awe-full throne,
I never should find favor
And mercy in His sight,
But be destroyed forever
As darkness by the light.


5. He canceled my offenses,
Delivered me from death;
He is the Lord who cleanses
My soul from sin through faith.
In Him I can be cheerful,
Bold, and undaunted aye;
In Him I am not fearful
Of God's great Judgment Day.


6. Naught, naught, can now condemn me
Nor set my hope aside;
Now hell no more can claim me,
Its fury I deride.
No sentence e'er reproves me,
No ill destroys my peace;
For Christ, my Savior, loves me
And shields me with His grace.


7. His Spirit in me dwelleth,
And o'er my mind He reigns.
All sorrow He dispelleth
And soothes away all pains.
He crowns His work with blessing
And helpeth me to cry,
"My Father!" without ceasing,
To Him who dwells on high.


8. And when my soul is lying
Weak, trembling, and opprest,
He pleads with groans and sighing
That cannot be exprest;
But God's quick eye discerns them,
Although they give no sound,
And into language turns them
E'en in the heart's deep ground.


9. To mine His Spirit speaketh
Sweet word of holy cheer,
How God to him that seeketh
For rest is always near
And how He hath erected
A city fair and new,
Where what our faith expected
We evermore shall view.


10. In yonder home doth flourish
My heritage, my lot;
Though here I die and perish,
My heaven shall fail me not.
Though care my life oft saddens
And causeth tears to flow,
The light of Jesus gladdens
And sweetens every woe.


11. Who clings with resolution
To Him whom Satan hates
Must look for persecution;
For him the burden waits
Of mockery, shame, and losses,
Heaped on his blameless head;
A thousand plagues and crosses
Will be his daily bread.


12. From me this is not hidden,
Yet I am not afraid;
I leave my cares, as bidden,
To whom my vows were paid.
Though life and limb it cost me
And everything I won,
Unshaken shall I trust Thee
And cleave to Thee alone.


13. Though earth be rent asunder,
Thou'rt mine eternally;
Not fire nor sword nor thunder
Shall sever me from Thee;
Not hunger, thirst, nor danger,
Not pain nor poverty
Nor mighty princes' anger
Shall ever hinder me.


14. No angel and no gladness,
No throne, no pomp, no show,
No love, no hate, no sadness,
No pain, no depth of woe,
No scheme of man's contrivance,
However small or great,
Shall draw me from Thy guidance
Nor from Thee separate.


15. My heart for joy is springing
And can no more be sad,
'Tis full of mirth and singing,
Sees naught but sunshine glad.
The Sun that cheers my spirit
Is Jesus Christ, my King;
That which I shall inherit
Makes me rejoice and sing.


Hymn #528 
The Lutheran Hymnal
Text: Rom. 8:31-39
Author: Paul Gerhardt
Translated by: based on Richard Massie, 1857
Titled: Ist Gott fuer mich, so trete
Composer: Melckior Teschner, 1613
Tune: Valet will ich dir geben

--

"Rejoice, My Heart, Be Glad and Sing"
by Paul Gerhardt, 1607-1676

1. Rejoice, my heart, be glad and sing,
A cheerful trust maintain;
For God, the Source of everything,
Thy Portion shall remain.


2. He is thy Treasure, He thy Joy,
Thy Life and Light and Lord,
Thy Counselor when doubts annoy,
Thy Shield and great Reward.


3. Why spend the day in blank despair,
In restless thought the night?
On thy Creator cast thy care;
He makes thy burdens light.


4. Did not His love and truth and power
Watch o'er thy childhood day?
Has He not oft in threatening hour
Turned dreaded ills away?


5. He ever will with patience chide,
His rod falls gently down,
And all thy sins He casts aside
And in the sea doth drown.


6. When silent woe thy bosom rends,
His pity sees thy grief,
Supplies what to His glory tends
And to thine own relief.


7. He knows how oft a Christian weeps
And why his tears now fall;
And in the His mercy keeps
These things are noted all.


8. His wisdom never plans in vain,
Ne'er falters or mistakes;
All that His counsels did ordain
A happy ending makes.


9. Upon thy lips, then, lay thy hand
And trust His guiding love;
Then like a rock thy peace shall stand
Here and in heaven above.


Hymn #535 
The Lutheran Hymnal
Text: Ps. 56: 8
Author: Paul Gerhardt, 1653, cento
Translated by: John Kelly, 1867, alt.
Titled: Ich singe dir mit Herz und Mund
Tune: Ich singe dir
1st Published in: -Harmonischer Liederschatz-
Town: Frankfurt, 1738


--

"O Lord, I Sing With Lips and Heart"
by Paul Gerhardt, 1607-1676

1. O Lord, I sing with lips and heart,
Joy of my soul, to Thee;
To earth Thy knowledge I impart
As it is known to me.


2. Thou art the Fount of grace, I know,
And Spring so full and free
Whence saving health and goodness flow
Each day so bounteously.


3. For what have all that live and move
Through this wide world below
That does not from Thy bounteous love,
O heavenly Father, flow?


4. Who built the lofty firmament?
Who spread the expanse of blue?
By whom are to our pastures sent
Refreshing rain and dew?


5. Who warmeth us in cold and frost?
Who shields us from the wind?
Who orders it that fruit and grain
We in their season find?


6. Who is it life and health bestows?
Who keeps us with His hand
In golden peace, wards off war's woes
From our dear native land?


7. O Lord, of this and all our store
Thou art the Author blest;
Thou keepest watch before our door
While we securely rest.


8. Thou feedest us from year to year
And constant dost abide;
With ready help in time of fear
Thou standest at our side.


9. Our deepest need dost Thou supply
And all that lasts for aye;
Thou leadest to our home on high,
When hence we pass away.


Hymn #569 
The Lutheran Hymnal
Text: Ps. 92: 1
Author: Paul Gerhardt
Translated by: John Kelly, 1867, alt.
Titled: Ich singe dir mit Herz und Mund
Tune: Ich singe dir
1st Published in: "Harmonischer Liederschatz"
Town: Frankfurt, 1738


--

"I Will Sing My Maker's Praises"
by Paul Gerhardt, 1607-1676

1. I will sing my Maker's praises
And in Him most joyful be,
For in all things I see traces
Of His tender love to me.
Nothing else than love could move Him
With such sweet and tender care
Evermore to raise and bear
All who try to serve and love Him.
All things else have but their day,
God's great love abides for aye.


2. Yea, so dear did He esteem me
That His Son He loved so well
He hath given to redeem me
From the quenchless flames of hell.
O Thou Spring of boundless blessing,
How could e'er my feeble mind
Of Thy depth the bottom find
Though my efforts were unceasing?
All things else have but their day,
God's great love abides for aye.


3. All that for my soul is needful
He with loving care provides,
Nor of that is He unheedful
Which my body needs besides.
When my strength cannot avail me,
When my powers can do no more,
Doth my God His strength outpour;
In my need He doth not fail me.
All things else have but their day,
God's great love abides for aye.


4. When I sleep, He still is near me,
O'er me rests His guardian eye;
And new gifts and blessings cheer me
When the morning streaks the sky.
Were it not for God's protection,
Had His countenance not been
Here my guide, I had not seen
E'er the end of my affliction.
All things else have but their day,
God's great love abides for aye.


5. As a father never turneth
Wholly from a wayward child,
For the prodigal still yearneth,
Longing to be reconciled,
So my many sins and errors
Find a tender, pardoning God,
Chastening frailty with His rod,
Not in vengeance, with His terrors.
All things else have but their day,
God's great love abides for aye.


6. Since, then, neither change nor coldness
In my Father's love can be,
Lo! I lift my hands with boldness,
As Thy child I come to Thee.
Grant me grace, O God, I pray Thee,
That I may with all my might,
All my lifetime, day and night,
Love and trust Thee and obey Thee
And, when this brief life is o'er,
Praise and love Thee evermore.


The Lutheran Hymnal
Hymn #25 
Text: Eph. 5:19, 20
Author: Paul Gerhardt, 1659, cento
Translated by: composite
Titled: Sollt' ich meinem Gott nicht singen
Composer: Johann Schop, 1641
Tune: Sollt' ich meinem Gott